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I need to use a trim bit to trim several small pieces to match a pattern. I do not have a router table. I could throw together a very basic router table, but I'm wondering - can I chuck the trim bit in my drill press and use that to trim the pieces as a makeshift overhead-router?

thanks.

dw
 

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drill press?

I need to use a trim bit to trim several small pieces to match a pattern. I do not have a router table. I could throw together a very basic router table, but I'm wondering - can I chuck the trim bit in my drill press and use that to trim the pieces as a makeshift overhead-router?

thanks.

dw

You can try it but unless your drill press can go to 24,000 RPM I don't think you will get good results. You may just rip up the pieces.

Gary
 

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A drill press is not designed for side pressure on the spindle bearings. So you run the risk of really screwing up your drill press and possably getting hurt in the process.

Mike
 

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They make a nifty drill press attachment for a sanding drum that has a roller bearing on the bottom. Think of it as template sanding instead of template routing. The larger diameter of the drum lets you get a higher rim speed. Keep the side pressure to a minimum and use a pretty low grit drum. I'd take a jig saw to the work so you are sanding a little as possible. I have an osilating spindle sander attachment for my drill press and it works fine.
 

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Following a pattern

Are you using a plastic, melamine, bakelite, etc. pattern, or are you talking about a paper pattern that is glued to the work piece? If the latter, then as said you can sand to the pattern. If the former, then what you need is a "pattern bit," which is a router bit with a bearing that follows the side edge of the pattern, allowing the bit to create the same contour. One word of caution: make sure that you're within about a sixteenth of an inch of the pattern's edge before you use this bit to avoid loading down the router and/or creating a lot of tearing. Also it helps (sometimes) to use a climb cut, but be very careful with that.

~ Peter
 

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The safest

thing you can do is mount your router onto a scrap piece of plpywood, flip it over and clamp it to something sturdy. There you now have a router table. Give the drill press idea a wide berth. It was not meant to be.

Ed
 
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