Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
194 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking at picking up a new tool. I want to start building smaller items and making more precise cuts that my jig saw won't make. I also am needing accuracy when drilling for tenons or when you bore holes for euro hinges.

If you were going to buy your next big purchase...would it be a drill press or a band saw?

I have been looking on craigslist for both and the prices seem right. I looking for a bench top model of each as I don't have a lot of floor space in my garage.

Also, do you think a 9" band saw would be sufficient for just getting started with a band saw?
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
28,738 Posts
I would stay away from 9" bandsaws

I have a small 10" Craftsman bandsaw and it works fine for small and even 2" thick material IF you take your time and have a sharp blade.
That's the smallest I would get. Mine was on sale and you can find them occasionally in the store new.
I also got a Craftsman bench top drill press at the same time for my young son to make things with and to go with the bandsaw. The only real drawback to the drill press is the short travel of the quill/chuck vertically. You are limited to about 3" deep holes, which again in your case may be OK.

The older cast iron saws and drill presses on Craigs List are the ones to get. The cheaper tin and plastic ones that folks are selling are flimsy and they are moving on to better machines themselves. Don't buy their old problems.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
470 Posts
I spent a lot of years without a band saw, although I do have one now, but I wouldn't bother going to the shop if it didn't have a drill press.

Shop for an older press that has a depth stop and quill lock. Once accustomed to those features you wouldn't want any other.

Why those features. Lets say you want to bore a hole with your brad point bit exactly, did I say exactly :laughing: , where you made that divot with your awl. Run the quill down until the brad point enters the divot, lock the quill, the drill stays put and now you can clamp the piece to the table, release the quill and bore the hole. Not used in every instance but when needed it is there.

But wait, we aren't finished, remember that other feature, the depth stop. Let's say we want that bit to bore exactly 3/16" deep. The threaded stop rod will have 16 threads / inch. I suspect you are already ahead of me by now. :thumbsup: In case you aren't, turn the depth stop nut 3 rounds from "0" and the bit will stop exactly at the 3/16" depth. Again, not used in every instance but a very handy feature, especially doing repetitious work.

Enjoy your new pre - owned tools.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
If you have to choose I'd go with the drill press. So accurate and versatile. I think I also use it about three times more often than my bandsaw. Cheap old scroll saws are a dime a dozen. Maybe one of those could hold you over until you have the cash for the bandsaw
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
994 Posts
Boy, my drill press and my bandsaw are the tools I use most often in my shop. At this point I'm not sure I could do without either one. One thing about the drill press to remember is that it alone is worthless. The bits and sanding drums available are what make it invaluable so don't forget about that ongoing expense.
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
28,738 Posts
It's like, do I need a hammer or screw driver

If you work a lot in metal then by all means a drill press. I can't remember which I got first... 1/2" drill in a drill press holder I think. Real soon after a 12" Crapsman saw that I reduced the speed 10 to 1 to cut metal. I used that saw for years because I didn't know any better. The next one was an 18" Min Max...what a difference.:thumbsup:

It depends on what you will make most, but I couldn't be without my bandsaws...both metal and wood cutting. I probably have drilled more holes in metal with a drill press than wood for which I usually use a hand held battery drill.

A bandsaw is vastly under rated tool in my opinion and you can do a whole lot with it.... dovetails, tenons, curves, resaw etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,779 Posts
Drill press first, band saw second.
If you can't position the screw holes, etc, who cares how you cut the wood?
Besides drilling, I have a drum sanding kit for my little Delta 8" DP.
Besides sanding, I use high speed wheels for cutting and carving seashell (abalone, etc) as inlay for my wood carvings.
Besides that, I cut and carve copper for carving inlays, too.

I could not cut a 90 degree end on anything = Bought a Delta 10" power miter saw 30 years ago $250. End of puzzle.

I could not drill holes 90 degrees to the stock for anything. Bought a benchtop 8" Delta drill press $100. End of puzzle.

Would like to rip up fine stock for wood carvings, blanks, veneers and so on. = Bought a Ryobi benchtop band saw $100. End of puzzle.

Needed to rip up bulk stock for carving blanks and other simple wood working. = Bought a 10" Ryobi table saw $100. End of puzzle.

Sure, I'd like to have another 5,000 sqft for a bigger shop and another $40,000 for a line of General power tools. Not going to happen in this lifetime. In the meantinme, I get lots done and I'm happy with that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,983 Posts
You need both machines. You will just have to decide for yourself which you think you would use the most to get first. Just don't cheap out and get one that is too small for the job. Then you would end up shopping again for one that would work for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
353 Posts
I used the 10" Delta Bench Top Bandsaw for 10 years prior to getting the Delta 14" floor model. It did very well for me especially once I started using Timber Wolf Bandsaw Blades. You can find them on Craigslist occasionally for $75 bucks. I still use my Delta 12" BenchTop Drill press that I paid $100 bucks for.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,533 Posts
For me, the bandsaw was the first choice of the two. I haven't done a lot of mortise and tenons, and the ones I have done I could do by hand fairly easily. I got a full size drill press a year or so ago for free and I think I've used it maybe 8 or 10 times since I got it. It's great to have but I just don't use it very often.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top