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Look on the nameplate of the existing motor. It will tell you the HP, RPM and voltage. If you are lucky it may tell you the frame. Each frame has standardized motor mounting specifications.

Take a look at this thread for more information, including how to attempt to troubleshoot.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f12/repair-your-bandsaw-other-motor-crash-course-46405/

Once you know the information for the motor, then try looking for similar motor at Tractor Supply, Grizzly Industrial, etc.

Edit. Another thread with more technical information about motors.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f12/psa-information-ac-motors-48497/
 

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Croaker,

I went through a similar thing as you a while back. I have an older generic Asian drill press that had a 1/3 HP motor that wasn't up to swinging big Forstner bits. I just took my time and kept watching Craigslist for a more powerful one that would work. I finally got lucky and found a 3/4 HP Baldor for pretty cheap.

It turned out that the mounting plate on my DP would accept more than one type of motor frame. So I could replace the old 48 frame motor with the 3/4 HP, 56 frame without any fabrication. Here's the link for the thread about the swap: http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f12/motor-upgrade-question-47916/

Anyway, Dave gave you good information. Don't forget shaft size, too.

Why are you looking for a new motor?

Bill
 

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I have a 1/3 hp motor on my drillpress and like Dodgeboy said it's not up to the job. On mine I could put most any 1725 rpm motor on it. It's more a matter of dimensions than anything. Could you post a picture of your drill press so we could see what it needs.
 

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try Tractor Supply Corporation

Farm and Fleet, TSC other similar store carry electric motors in stock.
http://www.tractorsupply.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/SearchDisplay?storeId=10151&catalogId=10051&langId=-1&pageSize=&beginIndex=0&searchSource=Q&sType=SimpleSearch&resultCatEntryType=2&showResultsPage=true&pageView=image&autoSuggestURL=AutoSuggestView%3FcoreName%3DMC_10001_CatalogEntry_en_US%26serverURL%3Dhttp%253a%252f%252ftsc-prod-lb01.crossview.inc%253a3737%252fsolr%252fMC_10001_CatalogEntry_en_US&searchTerm=electric+motor

Your drill press motor will have a plate on the bottom with 4 slots, Frame type 56. This is the industry standard for fractional HP motors. Any motor with that type will bolt to your drill press motor mount. I have a 1/3HP drill press and it's fine for the small tasks like Forstners 1" and under and small twist bits. Hole saws take a lot of power and will require a larger motor like 3/4 HP or more.
Some smaller motors can be found at flea markets, and in garage and yard sales, just plug them in to make sure they work on the spot. :yes:
The step pulley is your friend. The speed at which you spin the saws and bits is critical for performance. The larger the cutter, the slower to RPMs should be. The small twist bits and spade need a high RPM, 1000 or more.

http://www.docstoc.com/docs/25590610/DRILL-PRESS-SPEED-CHART
 

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If you look close at the motor mount on my DP, I think you can get an idea of how you could make up a new mount. A flat plate with slots to mount the motor and a couple of 90 degree 'ears' to mount to the DP.



Bill
 

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The motor has a Duracraft look to it but mine has a simple motor on it instead of having the bracket part of the motor.


If you want to change to a heavier motor you might cut the bracket off the motor. You can see on the underside where it was spot welded. If you cut through those few spots the bracket would come off and you could just bolt the new motor to the bracket.
 

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I am thinking of cutting the bracket off if i can't find a new fan.
Can you make a fan. A piece of plate steel or aluminium, drill hole for the shaft, radial cuts for the blades, twist with pliers. May need to be filed to fit within the housing.

This is a big motor for perhaps a small HP which is good. Lots of copper, less amps for each wire, so less heat - normally. Still no idea how the plastic fan melted.

A drill press is not used for long periods. It should be possible to make you own fan.
 

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The motor has a Duracraft look to it but mine has a simple motor on it instead of having the bracket part of the motor.


If you want to change to a heavier motor you might cut the bracket off the motor. You can see on the underside where it was spot welded. If you cut through those few spots the bracket would come off and you could just bolt the new motor to the bracket.
Can I get a copy of this parts book ???
 

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....melted (plastic) fan

some caution required methinks. drill presses don't normally run under a load so heavy as to generate enough (prolonged!) heat to melt a plastic fan.

the motor may "run" - but if it's partially shorted this may be investing good money after bad.

definitely need to have the motor checked by a competent shop before investing in "fix & keep"
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Just a update to this very old thread. I talked to a electrician friend of mine who told me unless i drill a lot of holes at one time the motor probably would not overheat.
I have been using it since then with no problems. Almost 8 years without a fan.
 
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