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this a snip from the video
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cummins heavy duty? that is a lot of side load on the quill and chuck.
maybe a one time use. the wear does seem to justify the use like this.
this why some drill presses can not take a drill-press mortising attachment. the driving mechanism for the quill is designed for that kind of stress.
 

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Using the drill press as an arbor press. Hmmm. Seems to be a quick way of screwing up your drill press.
Someone, maybe me? should take a bathroom scale and put it under the chuck and see how many pounds of force a drill press can exert.
It will be different on a 20" or a 10" for sure, but by how much?

It would seem simpler and better to purchase a mortising attachment for a drill press.
He's not making small square holes like for mortises, with that setup, just "squaring up" the sidewalls on existing mortises.
I wonder how much deflection there is on that offset jig when considerable force is applied. Maybe not so accurate?
I like the general concept, but not the execution so much. I might consider removing the handles on some old chisels and attaching them to my 1 ton arbor press that I've used once in 30 years.

Seems like a cool idea but as others have noted, it puts a lateral force and hence bending moment on the shaft, which I doubt is designed for. A similar situation occurs when using a drill press as a drum sander.
Yes, but a drum sander will never see the kind of leverage that offset chisel will make on the quill. If you need to force that hard against the drum, the drum is worn out and you don't know that light pressure will rarely burn your wood. let the sanding paper do it's thing rather tha brute force.
 

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this a snip from the video View attachment 442808 cummins heavy duty? that is a lot of side load on the quill and chuck.
maybe a one time use. the wear does seem to justify the use like this.
this why some drill presses can not take a drill-press mortising attachment. the driving mechanism for the quill is designed for that kind of stress.
As toolmakers we were taught about no side loads on drill chucks as the arbor can give way.
I snapped 1 in my carear doing that so it's true. ..not good practice.
 

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he should have started out with the statement that the chisels that you are using must be razor sharp not just any old chisel but a very good chisel.

if you know how do you sharpen your own chisels to that kind of condition you can probably end up quicker by hand than trying to use the drill press.

here is a good way to have razor sharp chisel
he presents it well.
 

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Someone, maybe me? should take a bathroom scale and put it under the chuck and see how many pounds of force a drill press can exert.
It will be different on a 20" or a 10" for sure, but by how much?


He's not making small square holes like for mortises, with that setup, just "squaring up" the sidewalls on existing mortises.
I wonder how much deflection there is on that offset jig when considerable force is applied. Maybe not so accurate?
I like the general concept, but not the execution so much. I might consider removing the handles on some old chisels and attaching them to my 1 ton arbor press that I've used once in 30 years.



Yes, but a drum sander will never see the kind of leverage that offset chisel will make on the quill. If you need to force that hard against the drum, the drum is worn out and you don't know that light pressure will rarely burn your wood. let the sanding paper do it's thing rather tha brute force.
It look like a series of round holes where he was using a drill press to do the hand work. If he had a hollow punch mortising attachment it would have done both functions.
 

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he does show during the video he drilled all the spots out. he was showing an alternative of not having a drill press mortise.

his method I would guess less 10 holes.

alot of set up for each use on the drill press. maybe less than 50
vs Mortising Machine maybe unlimited numbers
no matter what method. you need to learn how to sharpen the tools.

if need to start making mortising I would look for a used machine first.
my second choice would be the drill press mortising tool
his idea, most likely not.

for my hobby at this time there is no need for it.

most of the time I will buy the equipment as I need it and evaluate the true need for it. versus an alternative.
vs a I want it. lack space enforces that method.
clamps do not follow that rule. they are my shop rabbits.




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So, I got out the shop "bathroom scale" and put it under the 15" Craftsman drill press, got a reading of 85 lbs.
Put it under the 20" Jet drill press got a 119 lb reading.
Put it under a great old Black and Decker drill stand and got 200+ lbs.
The 12" VS Delta Rockwell got 122 lbs
The 10" Craftsman got 122 lbs .
The 1 ton arbor press got 175 lbs.
What I learned:
It is very difficult to pull down on a drill press handle with all reasonable strength in one arm and then push the "take a photo" button on your smart phone.
This is the old drill stand, a $40.00 barn sale find. Now, all I need is a 3/4" drill for it, about $600.00.
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The 1 ton arbor press got 175 lbs.
So the 1 ton arbor press only exerted 175 lbs. on the scale? I understand that the force is spread over an area, and that it depends on how much you push on the handle and where it is in its travel, but that still doesn't seem right. I guess I need to figure that out. My brain is saying that would be like a 1-ton jack being able to lift only 175 lbs.
 

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So the 1 ton arbor press only exerted 175 lbs. on the scale? I understand that the force is spread over an area, and that it depends on how much you push on the handle and where it is in its travel, but that still doesn't seem right. I guess I need to figure that out. My brain is saying that would be like a 1-ton jack being able to lift only 175 lbs.
If I had 3 hands and the press was bolted to a bench, things would be different. I still had to take the photo and press down on the lever handle at the same time. Maybe I need to forget about a photo and put more muscle on the lever/
 

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Someone, maybe me? should take a bathroom scale and put it under the chuck and see how many pounds of force a drill press can exert.
It will be different on a 20" or a 10" for sure, but by how much?


He's not making small square holes like for mortises, with that setup, just "squaring up" the sidewalls on existing mortises.
I wonder how much deflection there is on that offset jig when considerable force is applied. Maybe not so accurate?
I like the general concept, but not the execution so much. I might consider removing the handles on some old chisels and attaching them to my 1 ton arbor press that I've used once in 30 years.



Yes, but a drum sander will never see the kind of leverage that offset chisel will make on the quill. If you need to force that hard against the drum, the drum is worn out and you don't know that light pressure will rarely burn your wood. let the sanding paper do it's thing rather tha brute force.
[/QUOTE
It would seem simpler and better to purchase a mortising attachment for a drill press.
It look like a series of round holes where he was using a drill press to do the hand work. If he had a hollow punch mortising attachment it would have done both functions.
Actually even a mortise machine or a drill press attachment is not the do all, end all in making quality mortise and tenon joints. All mortise chisels cut a slightly undersized hole. This is to allow the mortise to be fitted to the tenon. Always cut quality tenons first. I finally broke down and watched a few YouTube videos on using a drill press attachment and how to tune a new one to get quality joints. Bought the one on Amazon that came the closest to my quill OD. Love it now, after a good tune up,as it does do a lot of the work very well leaving just a bit of finishing to fit the tenons.
 
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