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Hey guys:

I am looking for a way to drill perpendicular hole on a flat surface of wood for connecting dowel installation.

The tricky part for me is that the standard way of using a drill press won't apply well here due to the non-flat and non-parallel surface on the other side of the wood piece I need to drill on, also the whole structure that's composed of a number of wood pieces jointed together might be too delicate/complex in shape/large in size to put on the drill press nicely.

What I'm really hoping to find is something of a small mobile guide, some flexible hand held device which mounts a drill that ensures perpendicular drilling, and the only thing it's relying upon is the flat surface where the hole is located.

I am not looking for that accurate drilling here; most of the dowel connection is hidden in the finished project, all I want is a mechanical connection for two surfaces that's reasonably precise.

Any ideas?

Sincerely,

Michael tx
 

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Sawdust Creator
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I bought one of those....for a very similar purpose....and quickly returned it. It could only be considered precision if you are using 1/4-1/2 inch as your benchmark for precise. It's too cheaply made for good tight tolerances. The craftsman one is equally crappy.
 

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We've no idea what diameter you are needing to bore but here is an idea for making a drill guide.

Using a flare tool bar clamp and a straight piece of copper tubing a preferred length with an I.D. smaller than drill size, drill a hole through the tubing the diameter you need after clamping the tubing section in the clamp. That's a home made / shop made drill guide for portable drills.
 

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where's my table saw?
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huh?

Hey guys:

I am looking for a way to drill perpendicular hole on a flat surface of wood for connecting dowel installation.

I am not looking for that accurate drilling here; most of the dowel connection is hidden in the finished project, all I want is a mechanical connection for two surfaces that's reasonably precise.

Any ideas?

Sincerely,

Michael tx
I think I get it, so here's my solution. Take a 2" square block of hardwood, drill your hole for the diameter dowel on one face and make it as vertical as possible. OR you can use the intersection of an metal angle as a guide or just two pieces of wood joined at 90 degrees, in the form of an "L".



 

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Old School
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Hey guys:

I am looking for a way to drill perpendicular hole on a flat surface of wood for connecting dowel installation.

The tricky part for me is that the standard way of using a drill press won't apply well here due to the non-flat and non-parallel surface on the other side of the wood piece I need to drill on, also the whole structure that's composed of a number of wood pieces jointed together might be too delicate/complex in shape/large in size to put on the drill press nicely.
This is what needs to be drawn or pictures posted. It's a bit vague the way it's stated.





.,
 

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I think I get it, so here's my solution. Take a 2" square block of hardwood, drill your hole for the diameter dowel on one face and make it as vertical as possible. OR you can use the intersection of an metal angle as a guide or just two pieces of wood joined at 90 degrees, in the form of an "L".



Here is the whole article in case anyone wants to read up on it.






.
 

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I know what he needs. I made several of different sizes.
Imagine a catamaran boat with twin parallel hulls. Imagine the cross spars from one hull to the other.
In the location of the mast is the hardwood block.

Two parallel hardwood rails with cross pieces can follow most curves. At the center, the mast location, I have a hardwood block with the vertical drill guide hole very carefully made.

Drill one hole using the jig. Next use a dowel centering peg in that hole. Little aluminum mushroom with a sharp point on the top face of the thin flat cap. Add the matching wooden element and give it a little tap so that point makes a mark for the matching hole.

I've been able to assemble some really screw-ball wood carvings that way.
 
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