Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,514 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I may have jumped the gun, but I was going through my stuff and found a ½” Drill Chuck. I bought it years ago for an old drill and ended up not using it for some reason. So I thought I’d look to see how much a Morse Taper adapter would cost and I found one on eBay for $5 that can also be used for a wire brush.

Well I jumped on it because it was so much cheaper that the straight ½”x20 thread MT adapter. Now I’m wondering if I made a mistake.
How often do you use a drill chuck and what for?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
996 Posts
For $5 I don't see how you could go wrong. Even a harbor freight drill chuck costs more than that.

Once you have a tool like that, you'll use it pretty often and you'll wonder how you got
By with out one.

I might even order one just to have
 

·
No Longer Here, BY CHOICE
Joined
·
2,442 Posts
I usemine all the time. I use it for coring peppermills, drilling pen blanks, all kinds of things.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Sleeper

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,494 Posts
I may have jumped the gun, but I was going through my stuff and found a ½” Drill Chuck. I bought it years ago for an old drill and ended up not using it for some reason. So I thought I’d look to see how much a Morse Taper adapter would cost and I found one on eBay for $5 that can also be used for a wire brush.

Well I jumped on it because it was so much cheaper that the straight ½”x20 thread MT adapter. Now I’m wondering if I made a mistake.
How often do you use a drill chuck and what for?
If the Morse Taper the correct size for your lathe how can you go wrong .
It could be used in the headstock with a sanding mandrel too.


What MT is your lathe ?

PS . the one you have linked to has a threaded arbor
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
485 Posts
I have a 1/2" Jacobs chuck w/MT2. Use it all the time on the tail stock. Running forstner bits or hole saws into a bowl blank. Sometimes I use it on the headstock for spinning grinding wheels or sanding pads with shanks. Endless possibilities.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Sleeper

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,514 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
If the Morse Taper the correct size for your lathe how can you go wrong .
It could be used in the headstock with a sanding mandrel too.



What MT is your lathe ?
I have an Old tubular Craftsman with the 1MT which was one the reasons I was questioning it. I don't know it the 1MT has enough strength to hold a wire wheel and I was concerned about the length of thread. I thought maybe i should buy have bought the plan one purpose adapter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,494 Posts
I have an Old tubular Craftsman with the 1MT which was one the reasons I was questioning it. I don't know it the 1MT has enough strength to hold a wire wheel and I was concerned about the length of thread. I thought maybe i should buy have bought the plan one purpose adapter.
How much strain could wire brushing and sanding put on your headstock spindle , and the drilling strain on the tailstock should be minimal
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,514 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
How much strain could wire brushing and sanding put on your headstock spindle , and the drilling strain on the tailstock should be minimal
I don't know, but I suppose it would depend on how big a piece your using on the wire wheel.

There was a few time when I was glad that my big wire wheel was fastened down to the bench.:smile:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,494 Posts
I don't know, but I suppose it would depend on how big a piece your using on the wire wheel.

There was a few time when I was glad that my big wire wheel was fastened down to the bench.:smile:
As with sandpaper and scrubbing brushes , putting too much weight behind it does not necessarily make it work better :shifty:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,059 Posts
I may have jumped the gun, but I was going through my stuff and found a ½” Drill Chuck. I bought it years ago for an old drill and ended up not using it for some reason. So I thought I’d look to see how much a Morse Taper adapter would cost and I found one on eBay for $5 that can also be used for a wire brush.

Well I jumped on it because it was so much cheaper that the straight ½”x20 thread MT adapter. Now I’m wondering if I made a mistake.
How often do you use a drill chuck and what for?
That's not the right one -- the one on eBay is for a buffer such as the Beall buffs. Depending on your drill chuck there are normally three different adapters. If your chuck is threaded then the adapter that you need has a short threaded section and a shoulder that butts up to the chuck to provide registration alignment. You can't really count on threads alone to provide good enough alignment accuracy. If you can measure even the slightest amount of coning in the chuck then it won't be good enough for drilling on the lathe.

Most chucks used on lathes and better drill presses use either a JT6 or a JT33 adapter (JT = Jacobs Taper). The two sizes are nearly the same so make sure which you need if your chuck is the type that has a tapered socket. BTW, the chucks with a tapered socket instead of threads will give you better alignment. Typically you can find these adapters at Woodcraft and Rockler's for about $10 - $15.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,514 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
That's not the right one -- the one on eBay is for a buffer such as the Beall buffs. Depending on your drill chuck there are normally three different adapters. If your chuck is threaded then the adapter that you need has a short threaded section and a shoulder that butts up to the chuck to provide registration alignment. You can't really count on threads alone to provide good enough alignment accuracy. If you can measure even the slightest amount of coning in the chuck then it won't be good enough for drilling on the lathe.

Most chucks used on lathes and better drill presses use either a JT6 or a JT33 adapter (JT = Jacobs Taper). The two sizes are nearly the same so make sure which you need if your chuck is the type that has a tapered socket. BTW, the chucks with a tapered socket instead of threads will give you better alignment. Typically you can find these adapters at Woodcraft and Rockler's for about $10 - $15.
I'm sure it fits if it has 1/2"x20 threads like it says. I don't have a Jacobs taper chuck it is 1/2"x20. It may have excess threads but that's OK. The 1MT is what I have and it is a Chraftsman so I'm sure it fits.
I don't buy from Rockler because I believe they are outrages in price, but that's just me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,257 Posts
Hope I don't duplicate anyone's answer. I didn't read all the posts this morning. You can use a drill chuck in either the headstock or tailstock. It is not good for holding wood for turning. The jaws crush the wood and it gets loose and flies out of the lathe.
If you use the chuck in the headstock to hold things like sanding discs, wire wheels or drills you must use a draw bar to hold it in place. The vibrations (especially from the wire wheel or sanding disc) will make it come loose and fly out. Morse tapers for mandrel use have a hole drilled and tapped into the skinny end. You put a piece of threaded rod in this and then make a screw on adaptor to fit on the other side when it goes through the headststock. This locks it in place so it can't come out. CUT THE ROD OFF, EXCESS ALLTHREAD ROD STICKING OUT OF THE HEADSTOCK IS EXTREMELY DANGEROUS.
For use in the tailstock you can't use a draw bar. When drilling from the tailstock I always hold the chuck with my hand, especially when withdrawing the drill. If the wood binds up the drill at all it can pull the morse taper out of the tailstock quill and throw the chuck possibly injuring you but will certainly damage the drill. This is especially true when drilling with a forestner style bit. On those you must drill a short ways and back out often to clear chips. I've had a friend get one stuck so bad we had to destroy the turning to get the bit out.
A good solution is to drill a hole in the tailstock quill (it won't hurt it). De burr the hole on the inside by very gently sanding just the hole. Then insert the chuck with morse taper and mark where to drill. Now drill a shallow hole in the morse taper. Now when you insert the drill chuck you can put a pin through the quill and into the morse taper and it won't ever pull out.
I am going to be doing a short video on drilling on the lathe for The AAW fundamentals online magazine. If your an AAW member you will have access to that probably in March.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,514 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
........
If you use the chuck in the headstock to hold things like sanding discs, wire wheels or drills you must use a draw bar to hold it in place. The vibrations (especially from the wire wheel or sanding disc) will make it come loose and fly out. Morse tapers for mandrel use have a hole drilled and tapped into the skinny end. You put a piece of threaded rod in this and then make a screw on adaptor to fit on the other side when it goes through the headststock. This locks it in place so it can't come out. CUT THE ROD OFF, EXCESS ALLTHREAD ROD STICKING OUT OF THE HEADSTOCK IS EXTREMELY DANGEROUS.
Thanks John, it never occurred to me to put the chuck in the Headstock.
That might have been a better method of using a small wire brush and I probably would not have bought the one I did if I had known that earlier.:smile:

Looking forward to the video. :thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,514 Posts
Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
How were you going to rotate the wire brush when you had it in the tailstock ?
What I meant to say was that I didn’t think of using the chuck for anything else except for drill bits and the wood had to be on the head side because there was no way to hold the wood on the tail that I knew of anyway.

Actually I never even thought about a brush until I came across the arbor with the possibility of a brush. At first I passed over it because I thought that would I never need to use a brush on my lathe anyway?

I did realize immediately that the wire brush would definitely have to go on the power end. And if I would have thought to use a wire brush in the Drill Chuck itself then of course I would have made the connection.

The $5 price tag was what turned me around because it was half of what just a chuck arbor cost and I figured it might come in handy so I bought it. I may never actually use the wire brush, but I’ll have it if I need it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,514 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
It was already too late after I bought it, but last night I was organizing things in my shop and came across a box of all different sizes of concrete drill bits. I’ve had them for 20 years at least and haven’t used them since I bought my SDS Drill set with a whole set of SDS drill bits. Then it suddenly occurred to me that if I had a ½” drill chuck with a SDS arbor, I could use all those concrete drill bits. I have SDS bits, but they are expensive to replace and I’ll probably never use the regular straight bits.

I have an old Bosch 3/8” hammer drill that I used for these drill bits, but the chuck has seen better days and needs to be replaced. I took it in to be fixed once but the shop said it was too old and sold me the Milwaukee SDS hammer drill. LOL

Anyway I wish now that I just bought the Drill Chuck with the 1MT arbor as a set for the lathe and bought a SDS adapter for the chuck I have now. Oh Well, so much for thinking ahead. Although I may just go ahead and buy another drill chuck anyway with an adapter for one or another so can use it in my hammer drill.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top