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I find Hand plane more precision than drawknife.What kind of work you do with a drawknife and you can't do with plane.I have intention to buy drawknife but i am thinking will that be wasting money if i already have a handplane. At market i find unusual type hand plane. Acctualy its one blade welded to 2 rods and I'am thinking i wont buy that. So i went to blacksmith and he will forge one for my working. I taught its better idea.
 

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Log dog
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Two different tools.
I don't use hand planes to often, but I've used a drawknife numerous times.
Mostly for peeling logs and for shaping log ends for tenons.
You can't plane a board with a drawknife.
 

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Azur Jahić;518328 said:
Are drawknife just for round things like branch, logs etc. And hand plane somekind for planks.
Drawknives work well on rough and circular surfaces.

Hand planes work well on horizontal surfaces. They may not be flat to start with, but there are various types of hand planes to take a surface which is rough or not flat and make the surface flat and smooth. This may require several different models of hand plane.
 

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Azur Jahić;518626 said:
IS good idea to buy a drawknife that have a welded handles.The one blade is straight and there are two welded rods.To that blade
I think that will be fine, it is just a different method to fabricate the drawknife.

In the US the manufacturers had the machines to make the drawknife from a single piece of steel and bend the ends for the handles while the steel was hot. In the US we call the steel supports for the handle "tangs".
 

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Azur Jahić;518656 said:
I was woried about that welded spot on tangs. Can that be broken doing work.Traditionaly this kind of drawknife wasn't build in my pleace.This kind drawknife i first saw.
The weld should be strong enough to hold up to the work, assuming this was made with correct weld rod and a skilled welder so there are no cracks or weakness's in the weld.
 

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I think that you all should look here for the real deal.
Pay attention to the "log cabin" in the background of the home page.

www.logbuildingtools.ca

For a me, a draw kife is a bark stripper. A little one could shape a tennon. Spuds are surfacing tools. Maurice makes BIG drawknives, 4 dozen at a time) for serious log home building companies.

The common stunt is that they build your home on their site. When it's "together," they mark the wood, pull it down and truck it to your place. Up it goes in no time = no surprises.
 

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Log dog
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I know the process of building a log home from
Felling the trees to notching the corners.
And a drawknife is used to hand peel logs
So are spuds. The one the OP is talking about is probably a home made one.
 

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For 30+ years, I taught in a community college which actually had a log home building course. People came from all over the world (eg Finland, Peru) to do it. Extraordinary to watch as the build site was right on campus. Plenty of those people built a house or two around the city to hone their skills. The program was so successful that the administration killed it off (not sophisticated enough.)
 

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I've always seen draw knives used to remove a lot of material fast, usually to create a rounded part of a project.

On boards you use a plane called a scrub or fore plane to take a lot of material off fast but these planes work best across or diagonally across the grain.

On the edge of a board u can't go across the grain or you're going to get a huge amount of blow out or I think its called spelching. For this I'll use a draw knife. Not sure if its widely practiced but Works well, is fast and saves a lot of time vs sawing.
 

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What's the compulsion to make the wood flat? Just like everybody else? Like to drink downstream from the herd?

I come at this from a carver's perspective. I have lots of wood blocks, with knots, which will split out as fantastic boards with a serious 1" or 2" "wave" in them. My planer knife can smooooooth those out just fine, if I wanted to build furniture.

I want carvings, like fish bodies, from those. You need drawer fronts to show it off.
Very easy song, just 3 chords, all below the fifth fret.
 

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Azur Jahić;519051 said:
Are they somekind miniature of drawknife?
Spokeshaves are smaller than drawknives, but I do not consider them to be a smaller kind of drawknife. I think of spokeshaves as wood shaping tools. Many different styles. Some for flat wood, some for inside curves, some for shaping spokes, handles, etc.

I have this set.

http://www.leevalley.com/US/Wood/page.aspx?p=49142&cat=1,50230&ap=1

I used the flat spokeshave to make a profile on the edge of a cutting board. This picture was taken part way through the shaping.

Drawknives are perhaps a rough tool. Spokeshaves can be a rough tool, or a very detailed tool.

Wood Table
 
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