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Discussion Starter #1
Been looking for threads about the order of glue up for a table i'm making. It seems to me this would be a very common item but so far i haven't found the right info. What i'm looking to do is assemble legs and stretchers so that when everything is dry things will line up plum,level and square as possible. Maybe i'm making a big deal of it but it's my first table and i would hate to see all the work done so far go out the window. Also, having the clamps that i do,4- 24" squeeze grip as shown in pic, would it be worthwhile to invest in any other kind of clamping system?
Dimensions:
top-3/4x15x20"
[email protected] 7/8x1-1/2x20"
[email protected]/8x1-1/2x9-1/4", [email protected]/8x1-1/2x13"
thanks ahead of time
 

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i think you can do it all at once, at least the legs and stretchers. maybe attach two pairs of legs, then assemble them. i would attach the top, if doweled, but no glue. it would act as a template for alignment. HOWEVER, you can't have too many clamps!! so, by all means, buy some more if you see a need. also, white glue will add set-up time.

get all set up ahead of time: glue, brushes, wet rag/paper towel (blue ones work great), clamps, help if needed. clean flat work surface is key here.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
i think you can do it all at once, at least the legs and stretchers. maybe attach two pairs of legs, then assemble them. i would attach the top, if doweled, but no glue. it would act as a template for alignment. HOWEVER, you can't have too many clamps!! so, by all means, buy some more if you see a need. also, white glue will add set-up time.

get all set up ahead of time: glue, brushes, wet rag/paper towel (blue ones work great), clamps, help if needed. clean flat work surface is key here.
thanks Tim
Now that you mention it, that's the way we did it back when i was doing furniture repair at used furniture store in NY. The piece,usually a chair, was completely disassembled. The old glue was removed and then after the new glue applied, we often used strap clamps sometimes combined with pipe clamps. It was then put on a flat level surface and weights were placed on the seat for downward pressure. The reason i question this is because i was always doubtful of the instructions given by the lead technician as he had very little experience and knowledge.
It seems that if i do a dry assembly first, it will give clues to what and how much clamping will be necessary.
 

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The dry assembly showed me that assembling all the joints at the same time while maintaining plum, level, square was next to impossible at least for the novice that i am. The best way i could think of was to break it down(NPI) into a step by step method which i intend to share when all is said and done. It's now in phase 1, glue up of legs and stretchers laid out on a flat surface.:thumbsup:
 

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The dry assembly showed me that assembling all the joints at the same time while maintaining plum, level, square was next to impossible at least for the novice that i am. The best way i could think of was to break it down(NPI) into a step by step method which i intend to share when all is said and done. It's now in phase 1, glue up of legs and stretchers laid out on a flat surface.:thumbsup:
Glue up and assembly can be a PITA even if you're experienced. I would suggest doing the assembly in sections. In your dry fit, make note of the order you are comfortable with. As for the legs and stretchers, you may want to do a section at a time, leaving off one end until last. By the time you get glued up, assembled, and start to check for square, the clock ticks.


You may want to use a glue with longer open time if necessary, like a UF (urea-formaldehyde) glue...Weldwood Plastic Resin Glue. If you have rehersed your steps and have it all laid out for what you need, TB II or III may be OK. What you don't want is having to run around the shop looking for something you will need.










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Discussion Starter #6
Glue up and assembly can be a PITA even if you're experienced. I would suggest doing the assembly in sections. In your dry fit, make note of the order you are comfortable with. As for the legs and stretchers, you may want to do a section at a time, leaving off one end until last. By the time you get glued up, assembled, and start to check for square, the clock ticks.












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So i can breath again!:smile: I might have been giving it too much thought, and looking for the textbook way to do it. I respect the concept of "doing it right" so as not to form bad habits and avoid getting it done "by accident", but am not going to get hung up on ..."chapter 3,section 2,step 1a...now in this example you will see...." The pressure is now back down to neutral.:laughing: Thanks again C-man.
 
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