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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Do you leave 'em or not? I hate 'em.

I am gretting popular in woodworking circles I am even being quoted in BLOGS now. :laughing: You have to scroll down to the Nov 17th 2006 entry.

My LTTE was in this months or last months issue. Can't remember and it is at home.

Anyway, what's your flavor - lines or no lines?
 

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Forgotten but not gone
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
No Lee not pictured. My letter was just acepted and published. I was trying to find the whole thing and then compare how much they edited it. I never did get very excited about it until I saw myself quoted in the Blog. Silly me.
Anyway the point is that IMHO leaving the lines has no merit and not only ishould not be consideredd part of the form and obviously not the function, but I thiunk they actually detract from the work.
When I cut my dovetails, it is a tedious process just to remove the extremely light scribe that I use. If it is a wood such as Padauk, I do not even use a permanent scribe during the process. I use a VERY light pencil line that I simply erase (with a special japanese eraser; none of which I have left). I have heard some woodworkers casually mention "Yea I cut them by hand . . . " in a tenre that belies the truth about the matter. :icon_wink:
Someone whi is truly adept at the craft has a certain aire about the way the discuss handcut tails. :yes:
 

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Hi Texas Timbers, Merry Crhistmas!
When I am doing dovetails, I use a very fine pencil line at the depth of the joint. Then I use a scribing tool, usually a japanese made tool, to carefully mark the dovetails, without touching the aresa to be left intact. This way there are no scribes left in the work. Might take a minute longer, but to me it's worth the trouble. Sometimes I will use a fine pencil to layout the entire joint, and then using a coping saw, I will cut the joint. I am always surprised how quick and accurate this method is. (of course that's after a little practice).

Lee

Update: I forgot to mention I'm cutting the sides of the dovetails with a dovetail saw. and only using the coping saw on the bottom. ( instead of chopping them out with a chisel ). This makes for very fast accurate work of them, as you can stack cut several of them at a time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Lee thanks for sharing your method. i somehow missed your reply here.
I have used a coping saw but never became efficient with it in cutting dovetails. I do pretty well with one coping trim and crown moulding though.

I just love using a sharp chisel almost as much as a sharp plane, so I never stray from it too far.

It's been too long since I cut any I better take some R&R and cut some soon. It relaxes my mind and soothes the soul. Not trying to start a religous thread here but I am able to really meditate on my faith when I cut dovetails for some reason. Even though I know our Lord was not actually a carpenter I grew up believing that and so when I do any kind of hand work I drift into those thoughts.

I have not taken the time to make my own scribing tool but it is something I would like to do. Have you done so?
 

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Homemade scribing tool

Hi Texas Timbers,
No, I havent spent the time to do that, yet...

The coping saw on the dovetail, is pretty simple, as you're just cutting the flat bottoms of the joint. But I too, like playing with my Japanese dovetail chisels, so I know what you're saying.

What I have done though, is make a couple hand planes. That's an enjoyable little project, with great rewards, once they're finished, and can be really beautiful, with some nicely figured woods.

I'll be adding an article to the website soon, about them, but as always, busy, busy, busy.

The planes are a pleasure to use, once they're set up properly. Takes a little playing around to get the hang of it, like everything else.

I love the sound of a well tuned plane, shaving the wood! :thumbsup:

As far as Jesus being a carpenter, I've often wondered, when did he have the time? Seems he led a pretty busy life.

Nice to chat with you again.
 
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