Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Just getting started
Joined
·
95 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been making boxes with beveled joints. The box is open facing you, so you see the joint at all times in the display. Due to my inexperience and perhaps my tools, I have been unsuccesful at consistantly making a good joint. I have been spending a lot of time "tinkering" to get it right after the fact. I take my time on setup and think I have it all good, so I let rip making a hundred cuts for multiple end product boxes. When I go to assemble, they don't all work out. So, I thought what if I tried a double rabbet joint. I have a router table so I gave it a go. I have not been able to get a nice joint where there are no gaps. Is there a trick to this?

P.S. I am using 3/8 thick pine. Also, the reason I am trying a belveled joint and/or double rabbet is that each side of the box, on the inside, I have cut a dado all the away across before assembly, perpendicular to the joint. I want the dado obscured when assemled, but I also want a nice looking joint. The belveled joints look great when I get it right, but I am taking way too much time messing with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
What are you using for a saw?

I had similar issues when making box joints. I had a 35 year old Craftsman that would not go to 45 very easy. I finally purchased a Ridged from Home depot and put a great deal of time into the setup. That is the key set up. I have an incra to insure I have a solid 90 degree angle and very careful on the 45 degree of the saw. I now get really good boxes.
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
28,731 Posts
set up and glue up

I have been making boxes with beveled joints. The box is open facing you, so you see the joint at all times in the display. Due to my inexperience and perhaps my tools, I have been unsuccesful at consistantly making a good joint. I have been spending a lot of time "tinkering" to get it right after the fact. I take my time on setup and think I have it all good, so I let rip making a hundred cuts for multiple end product boxes. When I go to assemble, they don't all work out. So, I thought what if I tried a double rabbet joint. I have a router table so I gave it a go. I have not been able to get a nice joint where there are no gaps. Is there a trick to this?

P.S. I am using 3/8 thick pine. Also, the reason I am trying a belveled joint and/or double rabbet is that each side of the box, on the inside, I have cut a dado all the away across before assembly, perpendicular to the joint. I want the dado obscured when assemled, but I also want a nice looking joint. The belveled joints look great when I get it right, but I am taking way too much time messing with it.
It doesn't matter if the top is open or facing you if the corners are mitered they will show either way. The dado you are talking about is for a bottom/back I assume.....? The bottom must not be an exact fit or the pieces will not close together. Leave a 1/16" on at least 2 sides.

The bevel angle on the saw blade can be checked with a draftsman's triangle, or a digital angle gauge. Wixey WR300 Digital Angle Gauge - Amazon.com

If your angles are off, even 1/2 a degree, no amount of "fiddling" will help. You are either beveling the edges at 45 degrees OR if the pieces are under 3" wide you can cross cut them at 45 degrees on the table saw or miter saw. You must have 45 degree bevels or there will be gaps.

For an easy glue up method try this:
 

·
Old School
Joined
·
24,017 Posts
There's two tricks to making mitered corner boxes. First is that the angles have to be 45 degrees. Second parallel sides have to be the exact length, and the same thickness.

For square and rectangle. I suggest, miter one end of all the pieces. For a square, make a jig to make the first side, the length to miter the other end, and then use that jig to cut the other three.

For a rectangle you may have two jigs or a spacer to fit. First miter the two long sides for length and then do the two shorter lengths.






.
 

·
Rough Sawn Lumber
Joined
·
196 Posts
You need to agonize over your setup which could take a half hour to a couple of hours to get it dialed in. When setting up for a 45 degree mitre I use overly long pieces for test cuts as this will exaggerate any error. When you are happy with that the smaller pieces will definitely be right on.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top