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Hi guys! I did this all today and there is a story behind it so just hold up! Ok here's the story. My teacher got a nice block of Curley maple and wanted to make a judges gravel out of it. He have the project to his "lathe guy" who is pretty good on the lathe. I came in the next day and asked him how it was going and the teacher told me the kid screwd him. He gave me the chunk and it was messed up pretty bad. It was allredy to small and one end was bigger then then the other. So me being the competitive one I am thought. Shucks I can do that! So my search was on. I found a cherry 4X4 that was in TERRIBLE shape the entire thing was cracked and split. Except, for a 5 inch peice in the middle. I jumped on it. My teacher kept explaining to me how this is a difficult project but I really wanted to do this because A. I wanted to prove I could do it and B. I know an auctioneer we go to him almost every Saturday and have become pretty good friends so I figured it would be nice to make him something he could keep. The same auctioneer has sold me almost every single plane I own. He's a great guy. Anyway! I started square and spun it til it was round. Laid out my lines. And then out my details into it. Here is what I got. The teacher was pretty impressed and thought it looked nice. I was pretty surprised that it came out! I was kind of nervous that I would mess something up. So currently I'm sanding it then will spin a nice fancy Handel for it. Let me know what you guys think!!
 

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Just wanted to add I will be cutting the ends off an then hand sanding them round.... This is also the first lathe project I have done that hasn't been a bowl. So I know I have a lot to learn but for the first time ever trying something new personally I didn't think it was to bad. I want to laser the mans name on the flat part in the middle. I think it will add a nice touch! Any and all criticism and helpful tips are greatly appreciated! Thanks for looking guys!
 

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JJ Been thinking about you wondering what you've been doing as of late. Starting to look like a nice project Two things that you can do to make your project easier for you. One of them involves taking it off the lathe, drill the correct size hole for the handle using vee block so it stays put and so you can center it. then plug the hole with dowel that you have turned to fit or maybe one ready made. Install it into body of mallet. The reason that you want to do this is more than likely when you drill the hole you will get some tear out, this reduces that.
The other thing that you might try is remount the end of the mallet in a scroll chuck this way you can turned the other end off and it will be smooth with little or no sanding a plus, then you can part the end new the chuck off and only have to sand that end. Also you will be able to finish it on the lathe. Sounds like a lot but they are simple things that will make your project that much better. Nice project and glad that your teacher has faith in your abilities.

Jerry
 

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Tearout in the hole is actually a good thing. You have a cross grain joint when gluing a handle into a head like that. woodmovement will break the glue joint over the years. I do one of 2 things to prevent this from happening. First I cut little nicks in the handle tenon by just touching the band saw lightly in about 6 or 8 places. Then I leave the hole rough or in some cases actually go in with a dremel and cut marks inside the hole. Then I use epoxy to glue it together. Epoxy will fill gaps and it runs into all the holes and nicks you created. These form little epoxy dowels that won't let the handle come out even if the wood shrinks. Been doing that for years on my mirror handles.
The other trick I learned from a friend who makes mallets for a company that teaches hammer forming of metal. After he glues the handle in he drills and drives a piece of steel into the handle tenon through the side of the mallet. That prevents the handle from ever coming out. I use brass welding rod or sometimes just use a dowel from the same wood.
 

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wood shavings said:
JJ Been thinking about you wondering what you've been doing as of late. Starting to look like a nice project Two things that you can do to make your project easier for you. One of them involves taking it off the lathe, drill the correct size hole for the handle using vee block so it stays put and so you can center it. then plug the hole with dowel that you have turned to fit or maybe one ready made. Install it into body of mallet. The reason that you want to do this is more than likely when you drill the hole you will get some tear out, this reduces that. The other thing that you might try is remount the end of the mallet in a scroll chuck this way you can turned the other end off and it will be smooth with little or no sanding a plus, then you can part the end new the chuck off and only have to sand that end. Also you will be able to finish it on the lathe. Sounds like a lot but they are simple things that will make your project that much better. Nice project and glad that your teacher has faith in your abilities. Jerry
ThanksJerry! It's nice to know some people think about me :)
I believe I am too far along now to go back and drill the hole. And I'm not quite sure what you are talking about when you say a scroll chuck. If you could elaborate on that a bit that would be great! Thanks for the kind words and interest! Here is a sneak inside view of the other project I am currently working on and a completed project I did for Christmas. It's a pistol case.
 

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john lucas said:
Tearout in the hole is actually a good thing. You have a cross grain joint when gluing a handle into a head like that. woodmovement will break the glue joint over the years. I do one of 2 things to prevent this from happening. First I cut little nicks in the handle tenon by just touching the band saw lightly in about 6 or 8 places. Then I leave the hole rough or in some cases actually go in with a dremel and cut marks inside the hole. Then I use epoxy to glue it together. Epoxy will fill gaps and it runs into all the holes and nicks you created. These form little epoxy dowels that won't let the handle come out even if the wood shrinks. Been doing that for years on my mirror handles. The other trick I learned from a friend who makes mallets for a company that teaches hammer forming of metal. After he glues the handle in he drills and drives a piece of steel into the handle tenon through the side of the mallet. That prevents the handle from ever coming out. I use brass welding rod or sometimes just use a dowel from the same wood.
Hi john, hope your doing well. I like the bandsaw idea! It sounds perfect and I think that's the route in going to take. As for the steel plate that sounds alittle above my qualifications at this point hahahahah although it does make a lot of sense! I don't think this gavel will be used much at all. So I believe the band saw idea will be enough to hold it.
 

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chuck

JJ nice side projects that you have finished and in the works. About the chuck I mean a four jaw chuck Super Nova, Strong Hold. Not sure but I think you used one when you turned some of your bowls.

Jerry
 
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