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I totally get you, but I’m not sure others do. They aren’t just dog holes, they anre extremely accurate dog holes. Agree 100% you need a jig for repeatable results, otherwise the error multiplies. If pencils and squares were accurate enough Mr. Parf wouldn’t be a millionaire.

A drill guide can be accurate enough if it’s good enough. The only one I’ve seen that measures up is the Rockler and it’s a little pricey, hard to justify for a seldom used jig.

96mm grid isn’t necessary. That’s why I think the pegboard system is the cheapest most accurate way to go. The trick is making a base plate adapter perfectly centered on the bit 😳. Not sure exactly how to do that.
Use the pegboard as your template/drill guide and overlay it on the stock you plan on using for the base plate.
 

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That‘s the basis for most jigs. Pegboard easier, get as big a sheets as you need, don‘t ah e to move anything.

@builtinbkyn2 — You need a base plate with 4 registration pins. The bit has to be centered on that. Check the Woodrave jig that basically it.
I understand. So what’s the issue? Place the stock you are going to use for the plate under the pegboard , pick four evenly spaced holes and drill away. The center is determined by the spacing of your holes based on the dog hole grid spacing you want.
 

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I think I see what you’re saying, but seems to me it would be better to have the hole centered exactly on a pegboard hole.

Thinking about it, the way to do it would be to install a 1/4” bit, turn the router upside down, drill a 1/4” hole in the accessory base, place on router base with the bit through a hole, and use double stick tape to attach to base. Drilling holes to match base would be a bit tricky. Then a piece of peg board and drill 4 dowel pin holes. This is basically what the Woodrave jig is. Unfortunately it’s no longer available. The advantage going you can create as big a template as you want, rather than be restricted like the Rockler, Domifix, etc.

What I don’t particularly like about the Rockler & Woodpecker is using a 1/2” bit + multiple passes & and having to run the collar around the circumference, as opposed to a single plunge cut with a 20mm or 3/4” bit.

When I do it, I think I’ll stick with the pegboard method and see how well it works.
Have you seen this Doc? Link Seems like a reasonable price for a true MFT top if you are going to use Festool dogs and components.
 

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Not sure how exactly accurate these MFT tables must be to be of use, but his method does introduce error. His measuring from the edge instead of simply using another 4mm something or other inserted into the holes he drilled parallel, was silly. He has one awl of 4mm and couldn't find something else that's the same diameter? And suggesting you can just eyeball things by aligning the jig across half the hole, destroyed all the checking of accuracy he did prior to starting. I'm sure it will be sufficient, but as I asked, not sure how accurate these need to be. I've never used one.
 

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I put that in the post to illustrate you can't slop your way through it. He could never rely on that table to reliably jig up anything square.


So you're able to get into the mind of an engineer or a production team in Germany? :) 35mm hinge cups, 32mm cabinet system, 20mm dog holes -- European standards and make perfect sense for something made in Germany.

Once upon a time, I had your attitude about Festool, and that's your right, and I agree to some extent, for example I'd never buy their jigsaw or miter saw. But I can tell you you're missing out on some excellent sanders. On second thought, nevermind, didn't you say you don't sand anything?:ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:
He did take himself seriously lol

Hand cutting mortises and tenons can be relaxing or frustrating lol, but I do love my Festool Dominos to make quick work of things. Worth the price of admission IMO.
 

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I use all methods including router and hand cut. The right means and method for the job, as they say, and sometimes it's just fun to do things a different way. But never had an issue with alignment using Dominos. There's actually a setting to allow for overcutting by 5mm in the X axis to overcome any alignment issues on long glue-ups. Like any tool/machine/method, there are nuances that need to be learned/understood thru use. I had a bench top mortiser and sold it. There have been times I considered a PM floor mortiser but just couldn't justify giving up the landscape it requires in the shop. Biscuits are fine for alignment, but don't provide the structural component of Dominos. That's where it shines and makes them easily repeatable.
 
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