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· That Guy
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678 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All

We replaced the table in our trailer with Acacia butcher block from the giant orange store and I ended up with a 2 foot by 3 foot piece leftover.

My idea is to put some feet on it to raise it up a bit and then fill it with dog holes to use as a clamping board for putting together face frames etc. I can clamp it to the bench and then remove and store it when not needed. Maybe when I get the bigger shop I'll build a base for it so it's a proper bench at the proper height.

You tube videos seem to suggest the best way to make 3/4" holes is with a 1/2" spiral router bit and a collar in a template made on a CNC machine. Woodpecker and Rockler both sell the kit.

So... has anyone ever bought this kit used it once and put it on a shelf? Want to get some of your $$ back?

Call me cheap but I don't want to spend $100 on a dog hole kit.

On the other hand I don't to spend a half a day building a jig so I can build a clamp table, I want to spend the weekend building some face frames.

The best possible answer is that someone else already has this, has used it, doesn't need it again and wants to pass it along for some $$


Jeff
 

· That Guy
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678 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The grid has to be square so you can brace two parts of a face frame against the dogs and have then held at 90 degrees while you screw the pocket screws in. This gives you a rail and stile that are aligned on all three axis, less sanding and no gaps. If the dog holes aren't aligned to begin with, then the face frames you build won't be square. I don't think that free-handing it will be accurate enough for cabinetry.

I've seen videos of people using paddle bits with one of those drill press jigs like Jim posted that you put your drill into. The dog hole has to be drilled at 90 degrees. A forstner bit would also work but you still have to make sure it drills a hole at 90 degrees, a plunge router makes a hole that is nice and sqaure with the top of the table.

I've been following this guy on you tube, take a look at 8:20 to see how he uses the dog holes and some clamps to align the face frame for assembly. This is what I'm aiming for.

 

· That Guy
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678 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
As a hobbiest/homeowner I need to pick a method and tool up to that method. My cabinets will all likely be in utility rooms, secondary bathrooms and/or laundrey rooms as well as my shop. I doubt my wife will want to let me build the kitchen cabinets. Mine will not be "on display" and further to that, they'll all likely be made of poplar and painted white.

So with that in mind mortise and tenon seemed like too much work, I considered dowels but after trying then a couple of times I found they were hard to get in the exact center. Pocket screws and a clamping table system seems like a good option.

I've asked the guy in the woodworking department at my local tool store to order this for me.


I'm sure it'll be $100Cdn by the time they are done with me but I like that it's the old 3/4" holes and I like that the cutting tool, in this case a 1/2" spiral router bit, never touches the template, you plunge, then rotate the router around the template hole with the guide touching the template and you get your correct hole. This means that the template won't get chewed, bitten or enlarged by contact with a spade or forstner bit.

Fingers crossed.
 

· That Guy
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678 Posts
Discussion Starter · #32 ·
At that price point I'll pick one up.

The Rockler template arrived today and I'm pretty impressed. It's nice thick plexiglass so I'm not afraid of it breaking, they included pins for the outside to align it on the first corner and then three special dogs to keep aligning it as you move along the board. Lastly they included the guide for the router.

I'll post up more once I've tried it.

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