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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

Was just wondering if planing after sanding, for example a smoothing plane to finish a board that was belt sanded earlier to remove milling marks, glue lines etc will damage the blade?

Or is sanding done strictly after any planing?

Regards,
 

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Sawdust Creator
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Not going to damage the blade....but why was it sanded if it wasn't to size yet?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Just got worried after another poster wrote not to use a spokeshave on an edge after it had been sanded as it would mess up the blade edge quickly.

Right now i'm working on a free-standing bookshelf made of maple with three shelves that will pegged into the sides (ie can disassemble shelves to transport). While thickness planing the shelves, there was some really horrible tear-out so decided to belt sand shelves to thickness. I will finish the surface with my smoothing plane.

I guess if i had a scrub plane i'd use that...

Anyway, it's good to know! Thank you for your reply!
 

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Sandpapers wear out, we all know that.
Where do those grit particles go?
Some in the dust, some embedded in the wood.

Very hard-learned lesson for myself as a wood carver.
I cannot do "just a little more carving" after sanding.
Can't just take a couple more strokes with the s/s after sanding tear-out spots.

At the end of the process, I need to see scratch-free carving cuts.
Particularly with a clear finish. Takes quite a while now to convince myself that the
carving phase, details and all, is well and truely done.

It's one thing to maintain carveing edges, maybe every 30-40 minutes or so.
It's exasperating to have to take the time to repair a crumpled edge or two.

Go ahead, do it. I hope you always have better results than I did.
 

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Hello,

Was just wondering if planing after sanding, for example a smoothing plane to finish a board that was belt sanded earlier to remove milling marks, glue lines etc will damage the blade?

Or is sanding done strictly after any planing?

Regards,
If you have the plane(s) I'd just use them to remove the milling marks and skip the belt sander. Why use a sander to remove the milling marks and then use a plane to remove sander marks? Skip the belt sander and you'll do a better job quicker.

As to damaging a blades edge after sanding, I can't say I've ever planed anything after sanding. However, Robson speaks from experience and common sense so I'd wait to do any sanding until after all planing/smoothing is done.

If you need something to remove glue lines, I'd recommend a card scraper or cabinet scraper. Quicker and you don't have the risk of gouging the wood.
 

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1) of course the fractured and dislodged abrasive particles act to dull the plane blade

2) finish planing should take the place of sanding.
 

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master sawdust maker
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a tuned up smoother. and a sharp card scraper. is all you need to prep a board for finish. personally, I find it easier, quicker, and cheaper to use a card scraper then sand paper. and the wood will have a better finish in my opinion. since the scraper actually cuts the wood fibers leaving them smooth. where sand paper tears and scratches the fibers finer and finer as you progress through the grits.

buy a couple $5 saws from the local junk shop. cut them into 3" x 5" blanks and you will be set for several years. maybe buy or make a burnisher.

Of course you will have to know how to use them properly and turn a good bur. But that can be learned and practiced!

But the best part is, no need for dust collection. no need to wear a mask or respirator. No noisy sander buzzing. No vibrating hands for 20 minutes after your done sanding and not spending a small fortune in sand paper that you end up tossing out once its used.
 
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