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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I'm trying to plan a few garage-workshop projects - the first of which is a custom stand/cabinet for my Craftsman table saw. Basically looking to build something along the lines of this . . . .



or this . . . .






Obviously, I don't need or mean for this to be a "high end" project ... and I think you can get the idea of how it will be constructed. Also, my garage workshop gets zero moisture/water (I live in Orange County - Southern California).

So my question is: Is there any reason why I could not (or should not) use 3/4" particleboard for the carcass construction of this project - as opposed to plywood or mdf?


My plan is to use pocket hole joinery ... possibly coupled with some dowel joinery also.




Looking forward to hearing your thoughts, insight, advice.


:smile:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I think you'll be sorry if you use particleboard. Maybe go to HD or Lowes and pick up their project plywood ($25?/sheet) or MDF. Construction plywood or even osboard would be better. Then paint it.

Reason I am investigating this is also budget/cost issue . . .

At Lowes:
3/4" 4x8 sheet Particleboard = $21

3/4" 4x8 sheet MDF = $32

3/4" 4x8 sheet Project Plywood = $35 or so
 

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I feel the same as djg. I am not fond of particleboard. It does not take fasteners as well as plywood. I would not want this for a work surface.

If you use particleboard I would glue gussets instead of trying pocket screws.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
i could be wrong, but i doubt that particle board would stand up very well to pocket hole joinery.
What about straight screws with accompanying dowel joinery?
 

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John
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So my question is: Is there any reason why I could not (or should not) use 3/4" particleboard for the carcass construction of this project - as opposed to plywood or mdf?


My plan is to use pocket hole joinery ... possibly coupled with some dowel joinery also.
Looking forward to hearing your thoughts, insight, advice.

:smile:
That's a pretty good reason not to use particle board or MDF. Sawdust and glue doesn't hold up well to screws, especially since you are also planning on wheels. :smile:
 

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I think I would make the carcass frame with 2x4's then sheet it with 1/4 ply. Make the table top with your 3/4 particle, but laminate (use screws counter sunk, not glue) with 1/8" hard board, which can easily be replaced when wore. Then use 1x2 to frame out the top to cover the edge. The hard board will last quite a while, I use it on all my benchtops done this way. This would be a much more solid construction, probably cheaper too.
 

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Old School
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If you were to use particle board, I'd go with dados and glue. Add some straight screws if you like, but be sure to pre-drill.
+1. :yes: If you use particleboard there are different types. There is an industrial particleboard, not to be confused with "chipboard" or "underlayment", or "flakeboard". Straight screwed, or dadoed/rabbeted, with countersunk coarse thread screws works very well. Same type of assembly configuration as Melamine.





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I think I would make the carcass frame with 2x4's then sheet it with 1/4 ply. Make the table top with your 3/4 particle, but laminate (use screws counter sunk, not glue) with 1/8" hard board, which can easily be replaced when wore. Then use 1x2 to frame out the top to cover the edge. The hard board will last quite a while, I use it on all my benchtops done this way. This would be a much more solid construction, probably cheaper too.
I'd go this route too, but I'd probably use 2x3s instead of 2x4s and 3/8" instead of 1/4" ply, but that is just my personal preference.
 

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captain,

I would think that if you were to use particle board, you should consider melamine. As stated above you would want to use dadoes and glue for any particle board based product.
Also, I don't know where in OC you are, but you should take a look at Reel lumber in Orange on Kraemer a little inland from the 91 at Kraemer.
They are a good source for hardwoods and their sheet goods are priced OK, comparable to the big box stores (or better) but with better quality.
You never know what they will have in special either.
Ganahl lumber would be another good place to go to check out their products.

I understand your goals with this, but I would think a few additional dollars here for plywood would more than pay for itself over the life of the saw station/work center.


Good luck with whatever you decide.
 

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Here's my opinion.

Particle board no way, MDF would be a step up but I would prefer plywood.

You talking $11-$14 more per sheet. Your likely going to use 1 maybe 2 sheets. Sure it's more cost upfront but what if you build it and it gives problems or your just not happy with it? Now you need to spend more money to replace the stuff you just bought. I think in the long run your cost are cheaper buying better materials the first time.

Just my opinion. :thumbsup:
 

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where's my table saw?
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Not to discount any of the great advice you've all provided thus far - because I am leaning more toward working with plywood at this point - here is an interesting article I just received in my American Woodworker newsletter ----> WORKING WITH MELAMINE
 

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where's my table saw?
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I hate Melamine

It will cut your hands to shreds. It slips all over the place. It won't take glue, you have to use an adhesive like Liquid Nails ...no penetraion of the surface. You should dado for shelves and then use adhesive. I wouldn't trust pocket screws, but that's just me.

A 45 degree bevel is sharper than a kitchen knife...... :thumbdown:
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
It will cut your hands to shreds. It slips all over the place. It won't take glue, you have to use an adhesive like Liquid Nails ...no penetraion of the surface. You should dado for shelves and then use adhesive. I wouldn't trust pocket screws, but that's just me.
Are you speaking of working with melamine or particleboard in general?
 

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It will cut your hands to shreds. It slips all over the place. It won't take glue, you have to use an adhesive like Liquid Nails ...no penetraion of the surface. You should dado for shelves and then use adhesive. I wouldn't trust pocket screws, but that's just me.

A 45 degree bevel is sharper than a kitchen knife...... :thumbdown:
+1. I was cutting 45's on both sides of a panel and had it slip while trying to flip, slicing the palm of my hand. Not the cleanest of cuts for sure
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
+1. I was cutting 45's on both sides of a panel and had it slip while trying to flip, slicing the palm of my hand. Not the cleanest of cuts for sure
You weren't wearing your protective gloves, were you?

tsk tsk tsk


;)
 
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