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Hello. I want to make. Small table with cabriole legs. I'm not doing anything with the foot, just round. Anyways my questions are.

1. How long does it usually take to make a cabriole leg? I'm doing this for class and we have limited of time. About 13weeks
2. The other is what kind of wood can I use And or what wood I shouldn't use? My instructor has soft pine.
cabriole leg
Thank you very much

*i also have looked ups some info for making some legs! but I kinda need some more info just to prepare myself
 

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It doesn't take that long to make the legs if you have the tools. If I had the blanks I could make a set of four in a couple of hours or so. Without knowing what the project was I could't say what wood not to use. It's like anything else there is a structural element to it and if you use a too soft wood for a application that needs a stronger wood then it will break. All you have to do is draw and cut a pattern on a piece of 1/4" plywood and transfer the image onto the blank wood on two sides pointing toward each other. Then bandsaw out one side and save the scrap. Then put the scrap back on the blank with masking tape and turn the leg over and bandsaw the opposite side. From there it is just a matter of sanding the bandsaw marks off. You could use a hand held belt sander or a spindle sander which would be better and easier. Then round the corners with the same sander and finish out with a random orbital sander.
 

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2 X 4 stock, ripped square makes good practice pieces. When I taught cabriole (or Queen Anne) leg making, I used SYP for the legs on a small stool project. However, I would never expect a pine leg to support any weight.

After you have cut any mortises, expect to spend an hour per leg. After some practice, you'll get a lot faster. I use spokeshaves for shaping after bandsawing the profile from the block.
 

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2 X 4 stock, ripped square makes good practice pieces. When I taught cabriole (or Queen Anne) leg making, I used SYP for the legs on a small stool project. However, I would never expect a pine leg to support any weight.

After you have cut any mortises, expect to spend an hour per leg. After some practice, you'll get a lot faster. I use spokeshaves for shaping after bandsawing the profile from the block.
I'm kind of surprised by this. I was under the impression that in the eastern side of the US, most 2x4s are made of pine. My logic has always been that if it can hold a house, surely it can hold me?

Curtis
 

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Sawdust Creator
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I use pine 2x4's for all kinds of garage and basement shelves, I've got some with close to 2000 lbs on 4 2x4egs that have held up fine for years.

My lumber rack is home built using 2 2x4 pine legs and plywood brackets and regularly has 3-500 lbs of lumber on it.....

Pines plenty strong if used in compression.
 

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I'm kind of surprised by this. I was under the impression that in the eastern side of the US, most 2x4s are made of pine. My logic has always been that if it can hold a house, surely it can hold me?

Curtis
We build with 4x2 pine here too and the strength comes from the methods of construction and the number of 4x2s used.

Cabriole legs are a different proposition altogether.
The cutting that is needed to get the curves out of straight timber slices thru the running grain .
Pine timber does not always have the strength to stand up to that under load .
 

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Scotty D
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Cabriole legs are a different proposition altogether.
The cutting that is needed to get the curves out of straight timber slices thru the running grain .
Pine timber does not always have the strength to stand up to that under load .

+1 :yes:
 

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Good info above. Getting the pattern right may take work to get the shape and support you desire. After I use my finger and a pencil as a marking gauge along the front edge to help with symmetry. Spoke shave, rasp, and I use a disk sander for the foot. On the bottom of the foot I draw an x for the center then use a compass to draw a circle as an aid for shaping the round foot. Be sure the narrow part of the leg is in alignment not offset much. There are pictures on google images of the legs as well as patterns. Have fun!
 
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