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Discussion Starter #1
I used BLO for the first time on some small projects after reading a bit about it on this forum. First off, I absolutely love how easy it goes on and how it brings out the warm hues of the wood. I have yellowheart and purpleheart in my project and the color is just stunning after the BLO.

My question, though, is do you typically topcoat over it? I have usually used lacquer on my projects and am wondering whether I need a topcoat. The projects don't need a hard protective coating on them, but I'm not sure if I need something to seal the wood after the BLO.

Jeremy
 

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While BLO is a very weak film finish, it's still not a bad idea to topcoat it; even on items that don't need that much protection. You can topcoat it with almost anything, but with anything "poly" and some waterborne finishes it pays to give it a little more time to cure. with non poly varnishes, lacquer and such you can usually top coat it the next day. Even sooner with shellac, but giving it a little time never hurts.
 

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The projects don't need a hard protective coating on them, but I'm not sure if I need something to seal the wood after the BLO.

Jeremy
If that's the case, you can get a build with the BLO (with several applications) which will be a film type finish. That would be easier to maintain than a varnish type film finish.






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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks guys. I appreciate the responses. I'm glad to hear that BLO is compatible with a range of topcoats and will definitely use that in the future.
 

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If it were me I would topcoat over the blo. It takes many many coats to build a finish using blo alone. If the oil finish is to your liking I thing tung oil would be a better choice. It also will build a finish and is waterproof where blo isn't.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks Steve, I'll keep that in mind for the next projects. I'm going to coat this project with lacquer. I'll post a couple pics when I get a decent photo.
 

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Thanks Steve, I'll keep that in mind for the next projects. I'm going to coat this project with lacquer. I'll post a couple pics when I get a decent photo.
You will probably be alright with the woods you are using to use any lacquer but if you finish something that is light try to use a pre-catalyzed lacquer. Most of the lacquers in the box stores are a nitrocellulose lacquer and they will yellow as they age. You would never see it on yellowheart. A pre-catalyzed lacquer is also more water resistant.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Steve, how do I know if its precat lacquer? I've been buying the deft brushing lacquer and either brushing or thinning and spraying. Is working with precat any different?
 

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Steve, how do I know if its precat lacquer? I've been buying the deft brushing lacquer and either brushing or thinning and spraying. Is working with precat any different?
Pre catalyzed lacquer is ready to use, like what you bought. You aren't adding a catalyst to it. Make sure your oil finish has cured, or apply a wax free application of shellac first. Personally I don't like using shellac, as it doesn't provide as good a base for a film finish IMO, but it works.

Since you already have the BLO applied, you could just topcoat with a wiping varnish. It may be a little amber, but will give a good finish. If you want to keep the same look, use a CAB acrylic lacquer, or a waterbase polyurethane. A waterbase polyurethane will be a fast finish and an easy clean up. It works best if sprayed.






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Well there are different ways of making lacquer. The nitrocellulose lacquer is made from dissolving cotton fibers and you know how cotton yellows as it ages so does the cellulose in the lacquer. The cab-acrylic lacquer is made from acrylic resins so they remain clear as they age. Generally any finish that is acrylic will remain clear. The only place I know of that makes the cab-acrylic lacquer is Sherwin Williams. It's not even listed in Mohawk Finishing Products catalog anymore. They called it butyrate lacquer. The Deft brushing lacquer is a better grade of nitrocellulose lacquer. It starts off water clear which helps prevent it from yellowing but it will in time. The pre-catalyzed lacquer is a two part catalyzed lacquer which they use polyesters as the resin. It should say pre-catalyzed on the can and should also have a expiration date on the can. Because they add the catalyst to the paint at the store or factory it normally has a six months shelf life. I believe Sherwin Williams adds the catalyst to the product at the store when they sell it. Last year we had a thread here about someone that bought some and the store forgot to add the catalyst. The pre-catalyzed lacquer will make a harder more water resistant finish than the nitro or cab-acrylic lacquer but it should be used over a vinyl sealer rather than lacquer sanding sealer. A better finish yet would be a fully catalyzed lacquer. With that you would mix the catalyst yourself by the batch because it has a stronger catalyst. The drawback is once mixed has a very short pot life. Depending on the temperature and brand you may have only a few hours to 12 hours before what is left over has to be disposed of.
 

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Masterjer said:
I used BLO for the first time on some small projects after reading a bit about it on this forum. First off, I absolutely love how easy it goes on and how it brings out the warm hues of the wood. I have yellowheart and purpleheart in my project and the color is just stunning after the BLO.

My question, though, is do you typically topcoat over it? I have usually used lacquer on my projects and am wondering whether I need a topcoat. The projects don't need a hard protective coating on them, but I'm not sure if I need something to seal the wood after the BLO.

Jeremy
How many coats of BLO did you use? If you flooded the first coat and ignore what it says on the can. Really flood it till it stops soaking in then add a little more to keep it wet and sand with 320 or 400. Wipe it in with your bare hand till it starts to feel dry to the touch. This will truly be a great hard first coat because you are including a greater thickness of the wood and you have really got a full penetration into and not on top of the wood. Same great look.

Then after 24, sand as you would any sanding sealer. Then add coats like it says on the can and wipe. Build one per day. Let it dry for a few days and rub it out. Which would improve even pollycrapaline.

I here so many dis BLO as if it were like butter on bread. But the above procedure will in fact hold up so well you can use it on anything but the mast of a boat.

Al

Friends don't let friends use stamped metal tools sold at clothing stores.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
PICs... finally!

I finally got around to getting some decent photos. I have been making a few small projects with my 13 yr old daughter, and she is going to be displaying these at a local craft fair. It has been a lot of fun working with her and spending some quality time amid the dust and noise. These have a couple coats of blo and nothing else. I still plan to spray some lacquer and see how I like that as a topcoat.

Miah Sanders1.jpg

Miah Sanders2.jpg
 
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