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I have a delta 6" jointer (second hand) paid $100 at the pawn shop.and a hand held I use for reclaimed wood. No planer :/

Most all of my handtools came from my father. As he said " the only electric tool we NEED is a thickness planer"
 

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Tudor Pete
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I also have both tools. A 6" Reliant floor model jointer and a 12"x5.9" Delta planer. The planer has been with me for at least 15 years and the jointer is probably close to that, maybe a few years less.
I have used them both a lot in the past as I used to pick up shipping skids for the wood to make my crafts with. Went through a few sets of blades untill I started using a metal / nail detector. Some nails weren't anywhere a nail should be... What I saved on the cost of wood, I spent in blades.
Ah well, live & learn. Now when using used materials, I always scan them for metal before putting them through my machines.
 

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Anyone who thought I was crazy for dropping money on a planer and jointer is now over borrowing them. All the time. Day in, day out :)
Like Kir650 said, it completely opens up your possibilities. You don't buy wood to fit your project. You make it work for you.
And, for me, there is nothing like taking a block of "junk" wood (even old firewood) and making something beautiful with it.
I think that's what it's all about.
 

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The Young Blood
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I've got the Ryobi benchtop model planer. It has a 12 or 13 inch capacity, and does a fine job of planing materials down. I don't have a jointer, but there's a Pawn shop in the area, so I may see if they have some tools, as you did. I do enjoy the planer, and have used it on every project I've built so far. You don't realize how helpful it is until you've used one before.
 

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Thumb Nailer
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Something I failed to mention before. Using sleds, you CAN face joint using a planer, but you can't thickness plane on a jointer. Basically speaking, if you have to pick one over the other, go for the planer first. Jointing functions can be done on other machines, just not as easy...
 

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Planer/Jointer

I now have both. I have a like new Dewalt 734 planer mounted on a stand that my father-in-law gave me. I just bought a used Grizzly 6" jointer.

Rick
 

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Old Toolman
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For years disn't think I needed a planer until I finally bought a Dewalt 12". Now, if it broke I would immediately buy another. Can turn junk wood into bery usable pieces. I use a jointer more than I thought. I have an OLD Powermatic that weighs about 500 pounds. BUT, it has a base added with wheels, so I can move it.
 

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I have a woodmaster 18" planer & an older craftsman 6" jointer, and a Logosol 4 sided planer moulder. Having a planer will expand your ability to create different thickness materials. That's really helpful for custom work. It's also hard to find 6/4 & 8/4 stock in box stores when you need thick material. There are some companies that are now making combination planer jointers to save space. They are a little pricy though.
Jim
 

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I bought my Powermatic 50, jointer on Ebay, for $180, and my 12" Boice Crane planer on CL for $150.
I use a lot of recycled wood, and the 2 machines, make it possible.
 

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I have a jointer and I use my dad's planer when needed. They really are handy machines to have. But if you choose only one go with the planer.
--Matt
 

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I'm curious to know how many here own their own planers and jointers. So far I've bought wood s2s and used my router table and table saw to square the edges. The process usually works out fine, and I've had few issues doing things this way for the type of work I've done up to this point.

As I learn more about the craft I've been mulling over buying a planer and a jointer of my own. However, the money seems hard for me to justify (ok, I admit, I'm adverse to spending money unless I really have to). Buying lumber s2s is only about 14 cents more per board foot at my hardwood dealer than buying rough stock. Plus, I don't have to maintain (or find space in my workshop for) two more machines. Doing the math I'd have to surface over 5700 board feet before a decent (new) version of these two tools paid for themselves, not considering maintenance and cost to run the machines. Of course, me being me I probably won't pay full price for them if I do buy them, I'll get a good deal on second hand tools, but the point still stands.That all said, I'd love to have some more experienced wood workers weigh in on this topic. How many of you own your own jointers and planers? What do you see as the primary advantages of owning them? Thanks in advance for any insight you can share.
By s2s, I take it you get material sanded on 2 sides for only 14 cents more a bf. I would continue doing business with this supplier and forget about buying a planer or joiner.

I have a Woodmaster 25" planer/molder with the sanding setup and if I were to sand material for anyone, I would certainly have to charge more than 14 cents more a board foot. So you are getting one great deal in my estimation.
 

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HALL OF FAMER
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8,381 Posts
I now have both. I had to reorganize my shop to get this puppy in on Thursday. All 6' 4" of it and over 500 pounds. Got it out of the truck and into the shop by myself. I may be getting older, but I still have the strength. I can tell I'm getting older because it took me 2 days to recover. :laughing:



IMG_8052.jpg




Got her calibrated today and I'm very happy with the results. A couple of passes on a cupped piece of walnut and it was so flat, it was sticking to the table. Flipped it up on the side and edged jointed the side for a perfect 90 degree board. Took it to the table saw from there for the most trouble free and perfect board ripping I have ever done. I can't believe I waited this long to get one. I love it.
I've had the planer for years, and now I'm looking forward to getting the most out of my other machines, but starting off with a square edge. :thumbsup:
 

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Kenbo, That is a nice looking machine. I buy all of my wood off of craigslist. A lot of it is rough cut. I could not do that if I did not have the Dewalt planer and delta jointer. Bought a 16-32 performax sander last fall and now that highly figured wood does not get destroyed in the planer. It is amazing how we all are afflicted with the the same disease-if I had just one more tool.....
 
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I have the Ridgid planer along with the 6 inch Ridgid jointer. So far I love them both. Although I think my planer is finally getting dull. Have to kinda push the boards through it. :eek:
 

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Like many others here, I have the DeWalt 735 13" planer. I am very happy to have it as I can buy unfinished lumber and mill it to my own specifictions. Fir instance, most of the stuff I make is arts and crafty type stuff and I like having nice thick tops for dressers, sideboards etc. Rather than have wood milled for me or resign myself to using 3/4" thick materials, I can buy 4/4 and mill it to 7/8" which makes a very nice thick table top (sometimes I can get true 1" boards out of it.

I would say that my planer and my table saw get the most use in my shop. I woudl love to have a jointer, but space is at a premium and I can use my router table to joint if need be.

I offer two pieces of advice: Practice on your planer. Learn how it likes to work. It took me a while to find the "sweet spot" on my DeWalt where it would cut cleanly without tear-out and how to set up my in and out-feed tables to prevent snipe. Second, build a sled that allows you to mill one side of your lumber true (like this one http://www.finewoodworking.com/SkillsAndTechniques/SkillsAndTechniquesArticle.aspx?id=5245)

Best of luck.
 

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I have a Griz 8" joiner and a Griz 13" planer, both with spiral cutter heads. I love the spiral cutter heads and wouldn't recommend anything else. I suppose I could use my TS to do most of my joining (jointing?), but I'd rather have the joiner. And I absolutely need the planer.

It took me a while, but I have both the joiner and the planer setup perfectly. No snipe at all, good chip collection with a big shop vac. It's a pleasure to mill my stock because every piece comes out nicely planed, square and flat. Get 'em both, you won't regret it.

Kevin H.
 

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Planer/joiner

I have a ridgid portable planer but not a joiner most of my work is on the jobsite and a joiner of quality is not portable. I use my eureka guide rails with the router kit and either a router on it or a bosch portable planer guided by the rail with 20 ft of rail all joined together the guided portable planer works awesome. usually only 50 inches of rail or 100 inches is needed
 
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