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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought 300 board feet of rough sawn wood. Mostly oak but i did get 100 board feet of walnut too. I bought a planner but should i buy a joiner too? Is there a way to wotk without the joiner. Im planning on building a table with this and then what ever else strikes my fancy later. Thanks for any an all help. Thanks
 

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where's my table saw?
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rough sawn wood needs surfacing and jointing

You need a flat surface on one face before planing. There are ways to make an edge straight on the table saw....straight line rip jig.
Jointers create a flat surface off the bottom, planers take a uniform amount off the top. If the bottom isn't flat the top won't be either....simple. :blink: :yes:
 

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[quote="Ohio82"

]I just bought 300 board feet of rough sawn wood. Mostly oak but i did get 100 board feet of walnut too. I bought a planner but should i buy a joiner too? Is there a way to wotk without the joiner. Im planning on building a table with this and then what ever else strikes my fancy later. Thanks for any an all help. Thanks

[/quote]

If you plan on building a table the you're going to be doing edge to edge assemblies.

That being the case and assuming you're not a hand tooler, IMO a thickness planer and a well set up jointer will give you the best odds of success in fitting any project components.
 

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A jointer would be easier to get 1 side smooth, before planing.
But sometimes you want to surface a board too wide for the jointer.
You can make a sled for the planer. Set the board to be planed on it, supporting areas that don't set flat on the sled.
Like if you have a board that has a cup in it, you can set it cup up, and hot glue (or other methods) wedges, under the edges, that don't touch the planer. That way, when it runs thru the planer, the feed rollers, won't flatten the board, before planing, only to have the board spring back to it's cupped shape.
I've planed thicker rough sawn wood, with out jointing, as the feed rollers don't flatten the thicker stock.
That said, a jointer is nice to have!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I guess i should have done more research before i asked this question. Most of my stock is pretty wide. I think the smallest board i have in width is 10" I have a few that are 14. So i would only be using the joiner for edge joining. Unless im totaly missing something. Thanks
 

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that changes things somewhat

I guess i should have done more research before i asked this question. Most of my stock is pretty wide. I think the smallest board i have in width is 10" I have a few that are 14. So i would only be using the joiner for edge joining. Unless im totaly missing something. Thanks
You'll need a large jointer for that face width. :yes: and $$$$! Unless you go old cast iron and 3 phase. Don't want to go there? So what now? Use a planer sled. What's that?

Planer sleds are jigs that hold a twisted or curved board firmly in place on the bed of a thickness planer. Usually they are a flat plywood or MDF sheet with wedges located under enough points on the board to secure it. The planer has pressure feed rollers that propel the board into the cutterhead so unless the board has a flat bottom all sorts of things can happen. It board will twist under the cutterhead and be planed off unevenly it may even take too deep of a cut, stall the machine or tearout a large chuck of wood. :furious:
Here's how to do it:

As you can see by the video this is a time consuming process just to get one face of the board flat!
I made a simple one from threaded rod and 2 rabbetted rails:
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f2/planer-sled-rails-14940/
 

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I guess i should have done more research before i asked this question. Most of my stock is pretty wide. I think the smallest board i have in width is 10" I have a few that are 14. So i would only be using the joiner for edge joining. Unless im totaly missing something. Thanks
This statement "So i would only be using the joiner for edge joining." makes it sound like you are down playing the value of edge joining.

I very seldom use any rough cut lumber and therefore need to do very little "face" planning. However, I still have a jointer and thing that it is a very valuable tool.

George
 

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I guess i should have done more research before i asked this question. Most of my stock is pretty wide. I think the smallest board i have in width is 10" I have a few that are 14. So i would only be using the joiner for edge joining. Unless im totaly missing something. Thanks
If you rip your stock to the width of the jointer it can be glued back together and is better for stability.
You won't see 14" wide boards in a table top often, they will cup, shrink and swell a bit with humidity changes and break glue joints.
 
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