Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So my shop kitchen cabinets are almost finished and I'm about to start working on my first set of doors. Keep in mind these are my first cabinets and I'm learning as I go. Do I need a drill press to drill the holes for the hinges in the doors or can that be done with a jig of some sort and a regular drill? Ive survived working on small projects for two years so far without needing one and I really hate to but one just for that. Any thoughts?
 

·
Sawdust Creator
Joined
·
8,046 Posts
It's going to be pretty hard to get them all straight without one....also you don't have a lot of room for error on the depth. It could be done without but I don't know that I'd recommend it. Check Craigslist.....you can often find small tabletop drill presses for 30-50 bucks which would work fine for this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I watched craig's list like a hawk for a while and finally gave up looking. Everything I found was either ancient or priced as much as a new drill press. I'll check again though for good measure.
 

·
Old School
Joined
·
24,017 Posts
It's going to be pretty hard to get them all straight without one....also you don't have a lot of room for error on the depth. It could be done without but I don't know that I'd recommend it. Check Craigslist.....you can often find small tabletop drill presses for 30-50 bucks which would work fine for this.
+1. :yes: I agree. You could get the HF bench model, with discount coupons would be about $50 +. It's good enough with a carbide Forstner to get accurate holes. Just make yourself a simple table to mount on top of the DP table, like this.

Or, for about half the money, you could get a drill press frame that will hold any drill. There are a few variations of these. I use one of these out in the field.






.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,973 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
220 Posts
I worked on a project last summer where I needed to drill a lot of large 1 1/8" holes through 4X4s. After continually overheating my Milwaukee hand drill and nearly wrecking my wrist, I broke down and bought a floor standing PC drill press with 4" of spindle travel to get through the 4x4s. Now, with a good set of forstner bits and some drum sanders, it has become one of the most used tools in my shop. Very happy to have it. It makes repeated and measured hole drilling a snap, but also has many other uses.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
291 Posts
If you're installing 35mm euro hinges, a drill press will yield a better result. Assuming the forstner is drilling at 90 deg.

However, even with3 drill presses, I use a hand drill with a VIX bit to install butt and overlay cabinet hinges.
 

·
Sawdust Creator
Joined
·
8,046 Posts
Lowcountrygamecock said:
I watched craig's list like a hawk for a while and finally gave up looking. Everything I found was either ancient or priced as much as a new drill press. I'll check again though for good measure.
Where are you located?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
283 Posts
Check for a "Direct Tools" in your area. They are usually in outlet malls. I have bought many of my tools there and have been very happy with them. Not great customer service after the sale but its expected for what you pay for the tools. Some are new, some reconditioned some with warrantees some not so pay attention to what you are buying. If there is one near you get on their email list so you know when they have their 35% off sales. https://www.directtoolsoutlet.com/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,309 Posts
You didn't mention what type of hinges, but if they're Euro hinges, I would suggest getting a 35mm bit and making a jig for drilling straight and then trying out with some 3/4" stock. You'll need to go about 1/2" depth, but if you go more than that, you risk going through the door face. Because the hinges have a fair amount of adjustment to them, if your holes are not absolutely perfect, you may still have enough slack to make it work. BUT, try it on scraps and see. If you cannot get satisfactory results, then a drill press may be needed. My rule of thumb is, before buying a tool I cannot foresee using much, especially if cash or space is tight, try it with the tools I have on hand. If you are doing butt hinges or face mounted hinges, a drill press will do you no good anyway, so I assume you're using Euro hinges.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
I use a plunge router with a guide bushing and template I bought at rockler. The template was only like 10 bucks or so. It's quick and easy and effective.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,763 Posts
I'm about to replace 4 dozen old (1972) and broken cupboard door hinges. All that concerns me is the styles and the costs.
Holes? I have a Delta benchtop 8" DP which has drilled thousands of holes at right angles to the stock. Even if I cannot match the old holes, I know that new ones will be excellent.

I simply can't do that sort of cabinet work, as a complete buffoon, with a hand-held drill.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,880 Posts
If you have any routed edge on your doors I wouldn't attempt to drill the holes by hand. There is very little wood between the cup hole and the routed design. A drill press is what I use. I have also made a template and made the holes with a router. It's more time comsuming but it works well.
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
28,591 Posts
a simple jig

You didn't mention what type of hinges, but if they're Euro hinges, I would suggest getting a 35mm bit and making a jig for drilling straight and then trying out with some 3/4" stock. You'll need to go about 1/2" depth, but if you go more than that, you risk going through the door face. Because the hinges have a fair amount of adjustment to them, if your holes are not absolutely perfect, you may still have enough slack to make it work. BUT, try it on scraps and see. If you cannot get satisfactory results, then a drill press may be needed. My rule of thumb is, before buying a tool I cannot foresee using much, especially if cash or space is tight, try it with the tools I have on hand. If you are doing butt hinges or face mounted hinges, a drill press will do you no good anyway, so I assume you're using Euro hinges.
This jig can be used with or without a drill press. You will need to eyeball the depth or use a stop of some sort doing it "freehand".
The depth can be a touch over, but not so far as to pierce the opposite face.... :thumbdown: :censored:

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f27/euro-35mm-1-3-8-concealed-hinge-jig-16267/

They have commercial versions:
http://www.rockler.com/woodworking/35mm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,529 Posts
I watched craig's list like a hawk for a while and finally gave up looking. Everything I found was either ancient or priced as much as a new drill press. I'll check again though for good measure.
Ancient isn't necessarily bad. If you find a cheap one that looks good in pictures, go take a look. Is the table relatively easy to adjust? Does the chuck open and close freely, and if it needs a wrench is that still there? Does it spin correctly, and without wobble? Is it belt driven?

An old drill press may need new belts, but if it's mechanically sound and the motor works, it will probably work at least as well for you as a brand new one, and almost certainly better than a brand new one in the same price range. The one I have isn't exactly ancient (I think around 1980), but once the belts were replaced it works perfectly. The only reason I've ever considered replacing it is that it's a low-end benchtop model, and it's only got about 3" of travel, which means I can't drill all the way through a 4x4.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
You now have a great excuse to purchase a piece of equipment that is very useful on most project. You don't know how often you will use it until you have one. This was a piece of equipment I went without for several years and I finally purchased one and now use it on almost every project. I also purchased the drum sanding kit for it and this is also been used extensively. Never pass up an opportunity and justification to your wife to purchase a new piece of equipment that you can't do without:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
I like the idea of using a plunge router and template. I checked the rockler template and it shows temporarily oversold. What the heck does that mean? Is that a fancy way of saying out of stock? Anyway I'm still a couple weeks away from needing it so I'll see if it's available and order one then. Worst case I'll make my own like the other link shows.

I agree about ordering a new tool when you have the chance to and the wife is actually good with this one. I just set a budget for the project and another tool will shoot me over that limit. I try to be diligent about my budgets and not spend anymore than I have to. I'll try the cheaper version first and if it doesn't work off I go tool shoping.

So that brings me to my next question which i probably should start another thread on but here it goes. Anybody have any good suggestions for a new desktop drill press? I have room in the shop and actually built a place to store it under the work bench. I just dont want to spend a ton of money right now and I'm one that believes in buying good tools so I only have to do it once. That's the main reason I'm trying to hold off. I don't want to scrimp and save money now and end up paying for it later. Either way I'm open to suggestions.
Thanks
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
28,591 Posts
Search Amazon

Rikon 30-100 RIKON 8-Inch Drill Press - Amazon.com


Or Sears:
http://www.sears.com/10-bench-drill-press-with-laser/p-00934983000P

I have the Craftsman 10" myself, a decent machine for smaller projects. Not much travel on the vertical for deep holes, but I have used it to drill Euro hinges with the jig I posted above. However, a long fence on a add on table will help make the job go more quickly since the fence will determine the off set from the back and the jig won't be needed.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top