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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Well, when making another end grain cutting board I ran the end grain through my planer. It was done very little at at time, just so I could hear the getting hit. The edges were hit up very little, but I'll be routing those. So it worked pretty good. Does anyone out there think I'm crazy for doing that?

Eric Williams
 

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I think it is risky to run end grain board through a planer. I have read where boards have broken apart. Normal situation is tearout on the exit edge.

I have read other posts where folks normal practice is to run end grain board through a planer and they report no major problems, but I think they are playing the odds.

I would want to sand an end grain board. I have only made one, and I happen to have a drum sander, so not a problem for me.
 

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Well, when making another cross grain cutting board I ran the cross grain through my planer. It was done very little at at time, just so I could hear the getting hit. The edges were hit up very little, but I'll be routing those. So it worked pretty good. Does anyone out there think I'm crazy for doing that?

Eric Williams
Hi Eric - IMO it would be a lot safer, for you and the planer, to just make a simple planning jig for your router and use a large dado cleanout bit. The axis of rotation for the cutter would then be perpendicular to the board and should be much cleaner and less dramatic. :smile:
 
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The next time you do it try making the board oversized and running another board the same size and thickness behind it to push it through. That will reduce the blow out on the end what blow out you have can be trimmed off.
 

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I personally wouldn't run end or cross grain through a planer. I've run wood cross grain through one and it wasn't pretty. Never have run end grain and don't think I will.
 

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I've read where someone was badly injured when an end grain chunk tore loose and caused catastrophic failure of the planer sending shrapnel into the user.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
sawdustfactory said:
I've read where someone was badly injured when an end grain chunk tore loose and caused catastrophic failure of the planer sending shrapnel into the user.
I don't like hearing things like that but it is very important. Thank you.

Eric Williams
 

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Maybe I'm lucky but I've done the same thing. Run it through the planer with very light passes. I do have the exiting end chip out a little but I usually just run it across the table saw and take out that last little 1/4 inch. I haven't had any issues, but I do stand to the side of my planer no matter what I'm putting through it.
 

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I've read where someone was badly injured when an end grain chunk tore loose and caused catastrophic failure of the planer sending shrapnel into the user.
I've read somewhere that this story was made up.

In fact, 67.3% of internet claims are unsupported.
 

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i havn't had any issues. i even had smaller boards, 1/2 inch and taped (tape on the sides and not the top were its gonna hit the planer blades.lol) several of them together and ran them through. I'm sure it's not recomended. I thought about building a box for the thinner boards to hold them but, I don't do it enough to worry about it. I do have one saftety tip. if your planer isn't bolted down and your running 2x6x8 rough cut through it, make sure ya support the boards or it'll pull your planer off the table.
 

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Here's the first link that comes up googling among end grain, injuries. I didn't bother going further. http://www.thewoodwhisperer.com/articles/end-grain-through-the-planer/

Yes, "tablesaw; injuries" turns up a lot, too. So does "chisel; injuries".

The thing that caught my attention about the claim was its sensational tone: "...catastrophic failure of the planer...", "...shrapnel...". It smacks of everyday Internet scare hyperbole. I didn't read every post at the link, but didn't see anything that seemed to match the claim.

The link did have a number of anecdotes from people who had bad results when doing endgrain planing. Some of these included clues to the reasons: The piece was too short or too thin, or wasn't flat on the underside. The stories often mention these lightweight benchtop planers. One guy even described trying endgrain on a jointer!

Also sprinkled in among the other posts in the link is the voice of reason, saying it is possible to do this safely. They all agree with my experience. To do this right, you need:

A flat-bottomed workpiece not too short or too thin,
Sharp knives,
Light cuts,
A sturdy machine,
A long-grain piece attached to the trailing edge of the work piece,
Some experience, and
Good judgement.

The last two go hand-in-hand, of course. If you don't feel sure you can do it safely, then don't do it.

And no one should be standing in line with the infeed or outfeed of a planer regardless of what's going through it.
 

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Knots are endgrain .
We pass them thru planers/thicknessers .
The sane amongst us take light passes , on machinery appropriate in size and capability for the job .
The same applies to endgrain blocks.
 

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Manuka Jock said:
Knots are endgrain .
We pass them thru planers/thicknessers .
The sane amongst us take light passes , on machinery appropriate in size and capability for the job .
The same applies to endgrain blocks.
Even if knots are end grain, it's a very small piece which is completely supported on all sides by solid wood. When was the last time you ran a single big knot, with no other wood, threw the planer?
I wouldn't think you have. Neither have I.
 

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I have planed the end grain on a cutting board before and it didn't turn out well. The first board I did it on worked out fine. The second, HOWEVER, took huge chunks out of the board, lodged planer blade into the board, and shot the board out the back of the planer. I was also taking the shallowest passes I could possibly take on the planer. All this being said, I would heed the warnings that you find on the internet. That's just my 2 cents though.
 

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Even if knots are end grain, it's a very small piece which is completely supported on all sides by solid wood. When was the last time you ran a single big knot, with no other wood, threw the planer?
I wouldn't think you have. Neither have I.
Read my first post .
And keep it real .
 
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