Woodworking Talk banner
1 - 20 of 86 Posts

·
Wood Snob
Joined
·
5,963 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Do any of you guys sharpen your own carbide table saw blades? Anyone own any of the machines I've seen on YouTube? I just watched someone sharpen 60 teeth in 4 minutes. Including setup.

It's not that I think it will save me any money. It's just that this kind of service is hard to come by around here. Shipping out is a pain.

Also, has anyone had a blade sharpened and you thought it cut the same as when you bought it?

Al

Nails only hold themselves.
 

·
Old Methane Gas Cloud
Joined
·
3,509 Posts
This was about 10 years ago.

I had a good carbide tooth blade sharpened at a local (garage) shop and it literally destroyed the blade. Yes the blade cut and it was sharp but it was like putting a Harbor Freight grind onto a Woodworker II.

Later, at a trade show I was admiring a $50,000 machine designed to sharpen carbide table saw blades. I had a long discussion with the tech support guy for the company. I learned more than I really wanted to know about the geometry of sharpening carbide tooth blades.

The screaming message is that to sharpen blades you need a machine that has the ability to grind the blade to the geometry that the manufacturer put on the original teeth.

Think of it this way. A carbide tooth before grinding is a cube. After sharpening, five of the surfaces of the cube are ground to five different angles. The guy with the machine in the garage probably can do two surfaces of two different angles.

For high speed steel blades, I've seen a guy do them by hand with a file. He did a rather good job too.
 
  • Like
Reactions: knotscott

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,445 Posts
I wouldn't attempt to sharpen my own expensive blades for fear of damage, and cheap blades aren't worth bothering with. For < $20, you can gain access to tens of thousands of dollars worth of precision equipment run by trained experts. You can load up on good closeout blades when they're on sale for a fraction of retail, then send out multiples to be sharpened to help maximize shipping costs and hassle.
 

·
Really underground garage
Joined
·
2,552 Posts
Yes I've done it...and done it quite well.

In terms of comparing doing at home/shop vs "sending it out".....think about that for a moment.

Consider sending it to a shop that's WAY too busy(good thing,except for your blade)....and your blade is in line for a Friday afternoon sharpening.You-all know what I'm inferring....just say the shop isn't paying enough attention here.

Compared to:

Homeboy has all the time in the world,has almost unlimited funds/equipment.And takes pleasure in not only sharpening "stuff",but has a thorough knowlege on the subject and can make minute changes to the tips geometry at will.

The machines that are used today have been very successfully designed to eliminate a lot of "skill" on the part of the end user.So,your sharpening shop can hire the cheapest HS kid that will stand in front of it and babysit it.Not saying this in a bad way......its the way machinery gets developed,like it or not.There just isn't enough time in the day for a study'd,highly skilled,highly paid guy to sharpen blades.We'll see a slight downward spiral in the overall quality of this service in the ensuing years I'm affraid.

There are benny's to sharpening "at home".....but you'll play heck trying to put any real numbers on it.And that's time AND money.....moreso than any perceived "precision"(which we can put numbers to).
 

·
Old School
Joined
·
24,017 Posts
Yes I've done it...and done it quite well.

In terms of comparing doing at home/shop vs "sending it out".....think about that for a moment.

Consider sending it to a shop that's WAY too busy(good thing,except for your blade)....and your blade is in line for a Friday afternoon sharpening.You-all know what I'm inferring....just say the shop isn't paying enough attention here.

Compared to:

Homeboy has all the time in the world,has almost unlimited funds/equipment.And takes pleasure in not only sharpening "stuff",but has a thorough knowlege on the subject and can make minute changes to the tips geometry at will.

The machines that are used today have been very successfully designed to eliminate a lot of "skill" on the part of the end user.So,your sharpening shop can hire the cheapest HS kid that will stand in front of it and babysit it.Not saying this in a bad way......its the way machinery gets developed,like it or not.There just isn't enough time in the day for a study'd,highly skilled,highly paid guy to sharpen blades.We'll see a slight downward spiral in the overall quality of this service in the ensuing years I'm affraid.

There are benny's to sharpening "at home".....but you'll play heck trying to put any real numbers on it.And that's time AND money.....moreso than any perceived "precision"(which we can put numbers to).
Just curious...how are you going to assure that each tooth (all its faces) is done exactly alike?




.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
355 Posts
It's work enough keeping chisels, saws, and scrapers sharp. That's not to mention the knife set my wife keeps using as ninja swords. A TS blade is one thing I'm just going to keep buying and would never try to learn to sharpen nor would I want to. Even if I knew how, it just looks tedious at best. One expense I don't mind incurring.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
598 Posts
I had one carbide blade sharpened in my life, and it never cut as smoothly after that. It was many years ago, and the savings compared to buying new was more significant to me than it would be now, but I wasted that $$.

I'm only an occasional hobby woodworker, so blades last me a long time, and the replacement cost averages out to a small cost added to each project. I can see that sharpening would be a significant savings to someone who makes sawdust every day though.

Having said the above, I have considered trying to rig up a jig to use my Fein Multimaster with a diamond sharpening blade to sharpen my sawblades. If/when I do, I'll be sure to post a full report of that disaster!
 

·
Wood Snob
Joined
·
5,963 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
knotscott said:
I wouldn't attempt to sharpen my own expensive blades for fear of damage, and cheap blades aren't worth bothering with. For < $20, you can gain access to tens of thousands of dollars worth of precision equipment run by trained experts. You can load up on good closeout blades when they're on sale for a fraction of retail, then send out multiples to be sharpened to help maximize shipping costs and hassle.
I'm not talking about hand sharpening. I'm talking about using my own machine. I don't have access to a place with tens of thousands of dollars worth of sharpening tools.

Al

Nails only hold themselves.
 

·
Wood Snob
Joined
·
5,963 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Noek said:
It's work enough keeping chisels, saws, and scrapers sharp. That's not to mention the knife set my wife keeps using as ninja swords. A TS blade is one thing I'm just going to keep buying and would never try to learn to sharpen nor would I want to. Even if I knew how, it just looks tedious at best. One expense I don't mind incurring.
4 minutes on a machine made for blades that's the size of a bench grinder at under $400.

Al

Nails only hold themselves.
 

·
Wood Snob
Joined
·
5,963 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Stevedore said:
I had one carbide blade sharpened in my life, and it never cut as smoothly after that. It was many years ago, and the savings compared to buying new was more significant to me than it would be now, but I wasted that $$.

I'm only an occasional hobby woodworker, so blades last me a long time, and the replacement cost averages out to a small cost added to each project. I can see that sharpening would be a significant savings to someone who makes sawdust every day though.

Having said the above, I have considered trying to rig up a jig to use my Fein Multimaster with a diamond sharpening blade to sharpen my sawblades. If/when I do, I'll be sure to post a full report of that disaster!
I can honestly say and agree with you. I have never had a good quality blade come back like new. Most cut like a cheap box store blade.

Al

Nails only hold themselves.
 

·
Wood Snob
Joined
·
5,963 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
rrich said:
This was about 10 years ago.

I had a good carbide tooth blade sharpened at a local (garage) shop and it literally destroyed the blade. Yes the blade cut and it was sharp but it was like putting a Harbor Freight grind onto a Woodworker II.

Later, at a trade show I was admiring a $50,000 machine designed to sharpen carbide table saw blades. I had a long discussion with the tech support guy for the company. I learned more than I really wanted to know about the geometry of sharpening carbide tooth blades.

The screaming message is that to sharpen blades you need a machine that has the ability to grind the blade to the geometry that the manufacturer put on the original teeth.

Think of it this way. A carbide tooth before grinding is a cube. After sharpening, five of the surfaces of the cube are ground to five different angles. The guy with the machine in the garage probably can do two surfaces of two different angles.

For high speed steel blades, I've seen a guy do them by hand with a file. He did a rather good job too.
I had the same experience, and when I confronted them about it, they had no answer. From that I took it they had never seen a glue joint blade.

thanks for your response.

Al

Nails only hold themselves.
 
1 - 20 of 86 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top