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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello Everyone! First post here!

Also, this will be the first project I step away from Home Depot pine and start working with some hardwood.

I am still thinking of different materials but leaning toward an oak top with maple legs (wife wants the bottom painted so figured maple is fine for legs and skirts)

I am really looking for plans, I want it to be a standard 6 person table (72inchs) that can be extended with leaf to fit 8 (96inches). I added a photo for inspiration. I like the simplicity of this table and think it's a good build for me but can not for the life of me find plans for something like it.

Thanks, everyone!

Carpenter Tradesman Wood Table Tool
 

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Hello Everyone! First post here!

Also, this will be the first project I step away from Home Depot pine and start working with some hardwood.

I am still thinking of different materials but leaning toward an oak top with maple legs (wife wants the bottom painted so figured maple is fine for legs and skirts)

I am really looking for plans, I want it to be a standard 6 person table (72inchs) that can be extended with leaf to fit 8 (96inches). I added a photo for inspiration. I like the simplicity of this table and think it's a good build for me but can not for the life of me find plans for something like it.

Thanks, everyone!

View attachment 435070
Congratulations on your undertaking. The wood you use may be dependent on where in the country you are located. I am on the east coast. If the legs are going to be paint grade I would normally us yellow poplar. It is relatively hard, paints well, stable, and cost effective as a secondary wood. Soft maple would be another option, slightly more expensive than poplar, slightly tighter grain. Both machine well. The top can be anything you and your wife like. As for plans, this is a suggestion based on how I have always designed furniture when done for my home. I go with my wife to some furniture stores and see what she likes, what she does not like, and what elements on each she might like or not like. I will take pictures, and sometimes a quick measurement. My wife will often save pictures from the internet of what she likes, and why. Finally, with the knowledge I now have of what she likes, I draw something. Then I show her, sit down and go over what she likes about it and what changes she would like. When the changes are done I draw a building schematic in CAD, which is n ot at all necessary but it helps me find my design mistakes. Finally, I make it. When in the shop I will lay the entire project measurements out on a stick with labels. This is called a story pole. I prefer to work off this rather than a tape measure or stick rule as there is less room for error. You can layout piece dimensions, tenons, anything you like. The fun part is you are making the project yours, not copying someone else's ideas. Over time, you will develop your own trademark. Have fun, good luck, post picks of your progress for us.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Congratulations on your undertaking. The wood you use may be dependent on where in the country you are located. I am on the east coast. If the legs are going to be paint grade I would normally us yellow poplar. It is relatively hard, paints well, stable, and cost effective as a secondary wood. Soft maple would be another option, slightly more expensive than poplar, slightly tighter grain. Both machine well. The top can be anything you and your wife like. As for plans, this is a suggestion based on how I have always designed furniture when done for my home. I go with my wife to some furniture stores and see what she likes, what she does not like, and what elements on each she might like or not like. I will take pictures, and sometimes a quick measurement. My wife will often save pictures from the internet of what she likes, and why. Finally, with the knowledge I now have of what she likes, I draw something. Then I show her, sit down and go over what she likes about it and what changes she would like. When the changes are done I draw a building schematic in CAD, which is n ot at all necessary but it helps me find my design mistakes. Finally, I make it. When in the shop I will lay the entire project measurements out on a stick with labels. This is called a story pole. I prefer to work off this rather than a tape measure or stick rule as there is less room for error. You can layout piece dimensions, tenons, anything you like. The fun part is you are making the project yours, not copying someone else's ideas. Over time, you will develop your own trademark. Have fun, good luck, post picks of your progress for us.
Super helpful, thank you!

I'm will look at yellow maple. Allways nice to do some more cost effective special if I'm just going to paint it. We have been looking at pictuers online and I have been doing sketches I think I should just trust my self and go for it. I guess the Lego building kid in me feels like I need the plans first but I think your right on make plans myself first then going off that. Also an east coaster (Northerner) so should have that wood.

Thanks again for the help and suggestions!
 

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I really enjoy working with cherry but that's me. Maple isn't difficult.

I really encourage you to build a small hall table first before taking on a major piece like a dining room table. The effort required is significantly more for larger pieces and your mistakes will be easier to fix. You will learn enough to make your second table much better too.
 
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Super helpful, thank you!

I'm will look at yellow maple. Allways nice to do some more cost effective special if I'm just going to paint it. We have been looking at pictuers online and I have been doing sketches I think I should just trust my self and go for it. I guess the Lego building kid in me feels like I need the plans first but I think your right on make plans myself first then going off that. Also an east coaster (Northerner) so should have that wood.

Thanks again for the help and suggestions!
I think you misread my post. I mentioned yellow poplar, or soft maple. Maple has a bunch of different species, but they are usually just broken down to hard or soft. Hard maple comes from the trees that bare maple syrup. I would not recommend that as it is touch to machine and not very stable, prone to twisting and warping. It is also close to twice the price as soft maple. I was from the NJ/NY area originally and both of those woods are abundant there.
 

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I agree with BigCountry that it would be good to build a small table using pine or even construction lumber first. Or, at least, use some scrap to mock-up some of the joinery (like where the legs and skirts come together. For plans, check out the on line archives for Fine Woodworking, Wood, Popular Woodworking, etc. They frequently publish fully illustrated articles on building various pieces of furniture.
 
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