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Sawdust Creator
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I'm not able to open the links with my internet. Both spraying lacquers and brushing lacquers are basicly the same thing. The difference is the drying time. Lacquer is formulated to dry really fast so it doesn't brush very well. What they've done with the brushing lacquer is thin it and add retarder thinners to it to slow the drying time down so you can brush it. Sherwin Williams sells retarder thinner by the gallon. You can just mix your own. Just don't use it instead of lacquer thinner, it only takes about a ounce or two per quart. Do most of the thinning with lacquer thinner.
 

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Why does one lacquer have to be sprayed

Hi ryan50hrl,

Steve’s right… the spray lacquer is thinned to allow it to move through the spray gun with a solvent like mineral spirits, which not only thins it but it evaporates quickly – also drying the lacquer faster @ the same time.

Brush on is thicker and dries slower and allows the brush strokes time to even out
 

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where's my table saw?
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not mineral spirits

Hi ryan50hrl,

Steve’s right… the spray lacquer is thinned to allow it to move through the spray gun with a solvent like mineral spirits, which not only thins it but it evaporates quickly – also drying the lacquer faster @ the same time.
Lacquer can only be thinned with "lacquer thinner" and other more exotic solvents. :yes:
http://www.artsparx.com/Undmatsolv.html
 
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Old School
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The difference is a brush grade lacquer is retarded to dry slower. Thinning lacquer to spray is done with lacquer thinner. A good paint store like Sherwin-Williams will carry different types of lacquer thinner, from a "fast", "medium", and a "slow". The slow thinner is a retarded thinner. With figuring a ratio of the "slow" thinner versus using a retarder to slow down the lacquer, may not fix the viscosity of the lacquer that is being sprayed. So, a determination should be made to get a proper medium. If you use a nitrocellulose lacquer, most lacquer thinners including an acrylic lacquer thinner can be used. If your lacquer is an acrylic lacquer, an acrylic lacquer thinner is recommended. The use of the term "acrylic" does not infer a waterbased product.






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There's one more difference in the examples in the links you included. The Sherwin Williams is a catalyzed lacquer meaning it cures chemically as well as by evaporation of the solvent. I believe the Watco is nitrocellulose lacquer which dries by evaporation of the solvent alone. Of the two, I think catalyzed is more nasty, but both require proper protection; I would dare say protection is required even when just being brushed. I've never seen a lacquer that really brushed well.
 

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Sawdust Creator
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Ok, so I've used both, and honestly both require breathing protection. But is one more durable? The brush on watco I've used looks exactly the same when it's all dry, it's as smooth as the sprayed stuff....
 

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Hi ryan50hrl,

Steve’s right… the spray lacquer is thinned to allow it to move through the spray gun with a solvent like mineral spirits, which not only thins it but it evaporates quickly – also drying the lacquer faster @ the same time.

Brush on is thicker and dries slower and allows the brush strokes time to even out
You say Steve is right. Then you say brushing lacquer is thicker. Steve says brushing lacquer is thinned. ???

George
 

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When I spray lacquer the first coats are pretty much as they come from the can. Possibly thinned 10%. I progressively thin the following coats. Personally I feel this gives a better finish.

George
 
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