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This looks nice: http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=18056

but I don't see how it is any different than simple clamping a featherboard to the table?

And even further, what is the difference between a featherboard and a "not-feathered board"? Is it just that if the stock isn't exactly straight it won't pinch the stock between the guide (the feather/non-feather board) and the fence?

Thanks,

Dave
 

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This appears to be a jig that will allow you to cut thin strips the same size. After you cut the first strip you slide the board and fence up against the jig and you will be set up to cut again. It also has a scale to allow fine tuning. A feather board has some give in it and you may have more or less tension on it each time. Hope this helps.
Tom
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yea, so that's why I'm wondering why can't I just push the stock and fence up against the feather board to make successive cuts?
 

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where's my table saw?
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They are completely different

A featherboard applies pressure toward the fence when ripping or on the router table and allows the work to be fed in one direction towards the cutter. The "feathers give slightly to allow feed ing and apply pressure. It takes the place of your hands and fingers close to the front of the blade, but never directly at the side or rear. It's a finger saver.:thumbsup:
The thin rip jig allows a reset of the fence at a constant dimension for multiple ripping of thin strips off the Left side of the blade. Rather than trapping them between the fence and blade as you might with a wider piece and still have room for a push stick, this device allows the work to fall to the left freely. Unless of course you are one of the rare individuals with a Right tilt saw in which case everything is reversed.:laughing: bill
To answer your question:
"Yea, so that's why I'm wondering why can't I just push the stock and fence up against the feather board to make successive cuts?"
The feather board will "give" slightly throwing off the accuracy.
 

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I don't see too much purpose behind it, but then again I never tried it. The reviews seem to be fantastic, and for only $15, I guess it can't hurt. But anyway, from what I see, it looks like the difference between that and a feather board is that it is easier to set up to make a precise thin rip, and here is why I think that would be the case:

You can slide the part up the miter bar until it is next to the blade, loosen the top knob then slide the blue part over until the tip of it just touches the left side of the blade; that is a rip width of zero. Then, using the 1/16" inch increments on the jig itself, you can then slide the blue part over, using that yellow tape as a measure, to the exact width of rip you want. A featherboard doesn't have any such measuring abilities built in. Then to make successive cuts at the same measurement, you slide your fence to the left until it sandwiches your work piece between the fence and the jig, and presto, you're set up to make a rip at the same width.

This would be my guess.
 

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I don't know if you need a feather board or this jig. It would help if we knew what you were trying to do?
Tom
 

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where's my table saw?
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Check out this video

Thin strip ripping by Charles Neil:
:thumbsup: bill
 

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I fail to see any purpose this jig serves that a feather board dont serve. Most woodworkers have a tape/ruler on their fence. I would think that one would be able to do the math on simple repetitive cuts. Also note that I am not big on the idea of pushing your fence up against a jig. I think more along the lines of accidental jamming than pushing. I think it's an accident waiting to happen. As for fine tuning, what is the difference whether you use the graduated scale on the jig or the one on your table saw fence?
I always use a 1/8" saw kerf blade to help make the math easier.

On a scale of 1 to 10, I rate this idea as a minus 5. The zero is because I dont see it as very functional and the minus is because I see a safety issue.
 

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Lookslike a very usful jig. However, those of is that have a craftsman table top with 5/8 miter slot are again at a disavantage on statndard 3/4 bar usage.
 

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Having watched the video 3 or 4 times

I think this Rockler thin ripping jig, is used like the feather board in the video and you do not measure over or use the graduated scale. Either of these methods will result in slight variations due to the inaccuracies of measurement. The jig is meant to be used as a stop when sliding the work and fence over to bump it, giving the same width every time, unless I am misstaken. Jigs are meant to increase accuracy for repetitive cuts and operations. If you are going to measure each time you don't need a jig. :thumbsup: bill
 

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I fail to see any purpose this jig serves that a feather board dont serve. Most woodworkers have a tape/ruler on their fence. I would think that one would be able to do the math on simple repetitive cuts. Also note that I am not big on the idea of pushing your fence up against a jig. I think more along the lines of accidental jamming than pushing. I think it's an accident waiting to happen. As for fine tuning, what is the difference whether you use the graduated scale on the jig or the one on your table saw fence?
I always use a 1/8" saw kerf blade to help make the math easier.

On a scale of 1 to 10, I rate this idea as a minus 5. The zero is because I dont see it as very functional and the minus is because I see a safety issue.
First off, how it possible that on a scale of 1 to 10 you give it a minus 5(-5)? Maybe the math isnt adding up but i just dont see it possible.

And second, what happens when you sharpen that 1/8" kerf blade? Its no longer an 1/8 of an inch! hmm
 

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Interesting thread.
I looked at the link for the jig, seems simple enough. It would be easy enough to make one. I frequently cut thin strips and could see a use for this. It's a lot safer when the cut piece can just fall off to the side instead of getting pinched between the fence. I give it a :thumbsup:
Mike Hawkins;)
 

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First off, how it possible that on a scale of 1 to 10 you give it a minus 5(-5)? Maybe the math isnt adding up but i just dont see it possible.

And second, what happens when you sharpen that 1/8" kerf blade? Its no longer an 1/8 of an inch! hmm

Sorry about the math confusion, I made the poor assumption that most people could think in the abstract. Silly me.

And what happens when you sharpen a 1/8" kerf blade is you get a sharper blade. If you consistantly move your fence over say 1/4" you will get a slice approximately 1/8" with a kerf approximately 1/8". In most of my applications such as form bending or inlaying it doesn't matter to me whether the cut-off slice is + or - a few thousandths of an inch. What matters is the consistancy. The kerf provides the missing wood and the cut -off slice provides the 'meat. The combined total will always be 1/4". So think in reverse. Play with a few numbers and you will see it makes sense. Of course this might change 1/10,000 of an inch or so with a sharpening so I will make sure that I dont sharpen between making veneers.
 

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Unless of course you are one of the rare individuals with a Right tilt saw in which case everything is reversed.:laughing: bill
LOL on that one.

Actually you could use a feather board for ripping thin strips. Just turn the non feather end so that one corner is a reference at the proper distance for the thin strips.
 

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rrich, I think we have a winner. That's what I've always done, or just suffer minor (very minor, usually) inconsistencies. I ripped about 70 strips of varying lengths for making my kayak deck. Yeah some are a little thicker than others, but it all gets sanded anyway and in that particular application minor variance adds character. I can see if you're making a veneer or something it might be good to have a consistent thickness, but I don't see this "jig" doing all that much more than clamping a board to the table at an angle will do.
 

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By thin strips Im assuming thinner than 1/8".Maybe Im doing it wrong but for 1/8" or thicker I cut em on the ts then use the planer to as thin as 1/8" or thicker.Thinner I use the ts with the thin strip falling to the left of the blade.I do use a featherboard except for the initial squaring up after one side has been thru the jointer.
 
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