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Ole Nail Whooper
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I downsized my shop a lot by giving away my Unisaw and buying a Dewalt jobsite table saw to start with. I like the saw pretty well except the fence is not square to the saw table. See the photo.

There is no adjustment to correct this, any suggestions?
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where's my table saw?
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I downsized my shop a lot by giving away my Unisaw and buying a Dewalt jobsite table saw to start with. I like the saw pretty well except the fence is not square to the saw table. See the photo.

There is no adjustment to correct this, any suggestions? View attachment 433003
Either the T head is not resting properly on the front rail, the right side is raised up, and can be shimmed up on the left,
Or adjusted like some fences with a leveling screw on either side? (old style Unifence has these)
OR, the fence bar itself is not seated on the T head correctly and can be shimmed or material filed away on the head so it sits square on the table.
I doubt if the fence bar is bent at the head.
The T head may have been improperly machined at the factory?
It should be an easy diagnosis and an easy fix!
It must bolt on some way, but that photo doesn't show any part of the T head, so we need another photo.
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@sunnybob and @woodnthings , the DeWalt jobsite saws have a fence/rail design that isn't anything like other saws.

@BigJim all I can think of is a sacrificial add on fence tapered (is taper the right word for that orientation? Like a clapboard?) to correct the angle. You'll lose some rip capacity, so make it easy to take it off as needed.

In some ways I like the little DeWalt TSs, but they are made more for hauling around in the back of a pickup than for fine woodworking.
 

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Ole Nail Whooper
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
@sunnybob and @woodnthings , the DeWalt jobsite saws have a fence/rail design that isn't anything like other saws.

@BigJim all I can think of is a sacrificial add on fence tapered (is taper the right word for that orientation? Like a clapboard?) to correct the angle. You'll lose some rip capacity, so make it easy to take it off as needed.

In some ways I like the little DeWalt TSs, but they are made more for hauling around in the back of a pickup than for fine woodworking.
Oh I agree Bob, but I can get the same results with this little saw as I did with my Unisaw but I have to work a little harder to get those results. I also have to use different tools but for the swap off of all the space the Unisaw took up, it is worth it to me.

I appreciate the information and suggestions.
 

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For those unfamiliar with the DeWalt job site saws, this is the fence ready to use. The knob is on a shaft with gears at the front and back of the saw, turning it moves the aluminum rails that are at the front and back, both ends of the fence clamps to the rails. The only adjustment provided is to set the fence parallel to the blade (I think, it's been awhile lol).
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@BigJim another idea. The Ps are the molded in pads that sit on the rails, changing the thickness of those at both ends of the fence will correct the angle to the table. The easiest way is to build up the side closest to the blade with masking tape etc, but maybe that will cause trouble with the clamp? If so then less tape and file down the pads on the other side.

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Oh I agree Bob, but I can get the same results with this little saw as I did with my Unisaw but I have to work a little harder to get those results.
Yeah I got a lot of good results from the DeWalt in the few years before getting a SS contractor, my 2 big issues with it: The short length of the fence and table front to back, can't really fault DeWalt for that, it is the nature of a job site saw.

The other issue, the non standard miter track shape. I think the shape is for cost saving. After the DeWalt the miter tracks on the SS are a delight to use.
 

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where's my table saw?
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@sunnybob and @woodnthings , the DeWalt jobsite saws have a fence/rail design that isn't anything like other saws.

@BigJim all I can think of is a sacrificial add on fence tapered (is taper the right word for that orientation? Like a clapboard?) to correct the angle. You'll lose some rip capacity, so make it easy to take it off as needed.

In some ways I like the little DeWalt TSs, but they are made more for hauling around in the back of a pickup than for fine woodworking.
OK, it's a proprietary design, not common with other conventional fences!
I see an Allen head screw in the top photo. What's it's purpose Bob?
A piece of Formica, with a very thin shim, layers of tape, another narrow strip of Formica, under the bottom edge, would correct that amount of "off square".
It won't affect the rip capacity and it would make for a slick surface to ride the work on.
 
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Sorry to offend, but it is what it is - a job site saw, made to bounce around in the back of a pickup, not really intended as a ww’ing shop saw.

You not only down sized, you downgraded;)
True, and a more adjustable fence, better miter slots etc would add to the cost and DeWalt wants to keep the price down. But don't you sometimes do things to improve the inherent short comings of a tool? Unless one can afford the best of every tool category I think it's part of ww'ing to improve things.
 

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There is no adjustment to correct this, any suggestions?
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What you show is the "beam" out of perpendicular to the table surface. You are correct, Dewalt includes no instructions for adjustment. However, it may be possible to correct this alignment.
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The "beam" item # 207 is fastened at the ends, to the "front head assembly #201" and "rear head assembly #210".
These junctions are secured with four M5 metric machine screws #205.
Font Line Parallel Schematic Technical drawing


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Zooming in on the rear head assembly, one can see the two pads which mate up to the inside surface of the hollow "beam". Providing there is room to do so, adding shim to either the upper or lower pad will effectively rotate the beam until a 90-degree condition is achieved. Note that both front and rear assemblies would need shimmed equally AND only the top OR the lower pad would be shimmed depending on the direction of correction needed.
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Ole Nail Whooper
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I will try to get back in the shop again tomorrow and check the saw out to see if these suggestions will work. I really do appreciate all the help, thanks a ton.
 

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I would do this first before shimming or removing material from the T head or tail end.
Remove the fence but leave the T head and the tail end on the rails,
Check to see if the mounting tabs are vertical, 90 degrees to the table using a small accurate square.
This will tell you which way to go at the top, shim or remove.
The photo you posted doesn't give a reference where that fence is on the saw table.
I would assume it's on the right of the blade, which means the top is tilting towards the blade.
Which then would mean a shim on the bottom bolt Or remove material off the top of the ends.
This is most likely a unique and rare occurrence and would be difficult to explain why it's happening on a factory piece of equipment, (fence)
If the fence bar is so tight to those end sections, you'll end up removing material, rather than trying to wedge a shim in between.
Another test would be to place the fence bar flat and vertically on the table and check it for perpendicular 90 degrees.
Possibly, just by switching it end for end or flipping it end for end you could reduce the amount of non-perpendicularity?
 

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I took my fence apart today, as it was very slightly angled inwards at the top.
If you are going to do this, BEWARE.
The four bolts holding the fence to the brackets are fine machine thread, inserted into plastic, and Dewalt have used a thread locker on them. At first I thought they were left hand thread as they refused to budge. When I finally got them out two stripped the plastic thread in the end caps.
I found the aluminium box channel is badly shaped ,bowing in the middle, so without a surface grinder it will never be 100% vertical.
I managed to get the slight lean corrected simply by putting two thicknesses of masking tape on the plastic brackets where the top screws fitted, tilting the fence backwards.
I threw the two bolts away that had stripped the thread because their threads were covered in the locking material and replaced them with 4.5 mm wood screws cut down to have only 12 mm of thread into the plastic.
Its a very easy and solid bodge.
The fence is now as square as it will ever be.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks Bill, the fence was about 7 inches to the right of the blade when I took that photo.

Bob, I watched a video or read somewhere, where the bolts had to be heated to be removed, as removing them cold would mess the plastic holes up. I guess they were right. I am almost afraid to do anything to the bolts. I appreciate your response Bob. I will let y'all know what I do to correct the problem.
 

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Thanks Bill, the fence was about 7 inches to the right of the blade when I took that photo.

Bob, I watched a video or read somewhere, where the bolts had to be heated to be removed, as removing them cold would mess the plastic holes up. I guess they were right. I am almost afraid to do anything to the bolts. I appreciate your response Bob. I will let y'all know what I do to correct the problem.
Too much heat will also mess up the plastic, so that doesn't sound like a good idea. They shouldn't be "red loctite", blue loctite at the most.
Use the correct size wrenches (metric) most likely and see how tight they really are. Do not use an open end wrench, only a socket or a box end wrench or Allen key? whatever?
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
That is what I am afraid of Bill.

Here is the video I was talking about watching about the screws. He talks about the screws at the time mark 9:48. That is also the saw I have, minus the roll around that I took off.

 

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Just watched that video. the guy is on a real downer isnt he?
My fence is newer than that one, it doesnt have the plate under the bolts. Mine is exactly the same as the diagrams in post 12. But the fix is really not difficult.
Start to finish with no prior knowledge I did all of mine in well under an hour, including using the dremel cut off wheel to shorten two wood screws as replacement bolts.
I didnt take pictures, because it just seemed so easy to me that it wasnt worth the effort.
 
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