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Discussion Starter #1
I don't know if this is a major mistake or no mistake at all. I stained our oak dining table (just the top) yesterday in the late afternoon, on my deck. I left it out there to dry and by the time I brought it in, there was a little dew on it. Not major drops, but a lot of little moist spots. I wiped it down and brought it in. The moisture didn't change the color, but at an angle I can see where the moisture was b/c it's less shiny there. Is it okay to lacquer it (spray) as is, or do I need to do something first?

Thanks for your help!!
 

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The clear finish should make it disappear, should anyway.
But for safety sake I'd wipe the entire top with a gray scotshbrite
scuff pad to even everything out first.
I usually do all my stained surfaces that way before finishing just
to remove the little nibs and dust. Then tack it off and finish.
The scuff pad should make it all the same dull gloss.
Just lightly wipe it down with it.;)
 

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Dew spots

I believe I would go over the top with the stain again and dry indoors. Clear coats have a tendency to magnify blemishes in my experience. If I could offer a suggestion, use polyurethane on the table top. It takes longer to dry but the finish will be more durable. It won't react to the heat of hot dishes etc and drinks with alcohol will not cloud it up . Lacquer fails both of these tests.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the help. I may try the scuff pad and reevaluate. My concern about going over it again with stain is that I don't want to darken it. I suppose I could get a very light stain...

As for the poly v. lacquer issue, I just can't get past the plastic appearance of poly.

Thanks!
 

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Pre cat

While I share your enthusiasm for the pre-cat lacquer, I can not accept that it is more durable than poly. I use quite a bit of pre-cat from sw but I wouldn't use it where it will be exposed to any heat, drinks or aftershaves/colognes. Even with a potholder under a hot dish, the lacquer will soften. Pre-cat or not and it absolutely will not stand up to alcohol.
As to the plastic look, don't overlook the fact that poly is available in the same range of gloss as all other top coats.
I am ready to call a truce though. You think your way and I will think mine.

Ed
 

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Thanks for the help. I may try the scuff pad and reevaluate. My concern about going over it again with stain is that I don't want to darken it. I suppose I could get a very light stain...

As for the poly v. lacquer issue, I just can't get past the plastic appearance of poly.

Thanks!
I hear ya on the plastic appearance of poly, I find that lacuer does the same thing. I would use wax, the only problem I have run into though is that you generally don't want to use wax and stain together... I think that if you make sure that the stain is totally dry you should be ok, but hwat I have noticed is that the waax and the stain will become one and get blotchy...I generally don't use stains.

www.jrwoodcrafts.com
 
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