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Hi, newbie here :)

I'm planning to build this table to make the best use of the available space. I don't want a leg in front where the two boards meet, so I intend to stabilize it with the two metal bars on the underside of the tabletop, as shown in the second picture.

Is this going to be stable enough? Any special tips for buying the wood boards and cutting one of them at an angle like this?
 

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I'm no engineer, but I'd like to see the cross supports resting on the legs, somehow. Otherwise, weight on one of the two pieces will tend to cause your supports to pull away from the other.
 

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Honestly, if the stretcher/support beam things have enough screws into both sides of the table, I believe you'll be fine. I don't think they need to be full length, but it certainly won't hurt to have extra support. If you're really worried, put a second, shorter, pair that extends across the joint for maybe 8-10 inches on either side and you'll definitely be fine. Are you using ply, or solid wood for this?
 

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Nope. Not gonna fly if somebody decides to lean/sit on the edge of your desk.
Frame first. Top can be attached by the finest Law of Gravity in our galaxy.

I have built several 8' x 32" desks in two houses. Most have two distinct work positions with
some catch-all lower shelves in the middle (aka support). On top is workspace plus several old tower computers. All the printers sit on shelves above that.

Bash-worthy benches.
 

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make a scale model

You can make a model of the table using 1/4" plywood for the tops. Pick a scale like 3" to the foot. Use wooden rails for the metal ones, keeping the size in scale. Load the model with weights where you would expect the greatest force to be...see what happens and where it fails.

Make another model the same size, no rails, but 2 layers of plywood. Load it the same way, see what happens and where it fails. This may prove a better solution because the rails concentrate the loads at 2 points on the rectangular table. Two layers of plywood will distribute the loads over a wider area.

Make another model but put a perimeter frame all around made of wood. I suspect this may be the best answer. The connection between the two pieces can be made along the intersection using screws in the full size version. The frame will stiffen the rectangular table's leading edge and allow the angles piece to screw directly to it.

I would use plywood for the final table rather than particle board which is not strong in bending, and will sag of it's own weight. Attaching the legs is a whole 'nother discussion. Use a circular saw to cut the material with a straight edge guide. Sawing to a marked line requires a great deal of practice.
 

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Honestly it will depend on use.

Sure if someone sits or stands on it there will be a problem. However they shouldn't be doing that to start with. If your sure that no one will do that then put several screws on each side of the joint area. Its not ideal but if you use steel tubing and enough screws its doable for the roght purpose.
 

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I'm planning to build this table to make the best use of the available space.
We have an introduction section where you can say a few words about yourself. If you fill out your profile in your "User Control Panel", you can list any hobbies, experience or other facts. You can also list your general geographical location which would be a help in answering some questions.

I'm trying to envision how the shape of the back edge will utilize or maximize the available space. Does the offset fit a quirk in the walls?

I would just make an apron from a hardwood that follows the leading edges of both the rectangular top and the angled one. It should be a substantial one...about ¾" (minimum) by 2½" (minimum) installed on edge to the underside. That would stiffen the front edges.









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Drop into Ikea or an office supply store and look under the desks they have on display for an idea of how to frame a desk of that style. You will probably see there is a frame, but it is not obvious looking at it from above.

You can use traditional methods as suggested but that will not give you the minimal look you show in your drawing.
 

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I'd keep the metal rails full length and place a full length piece of plywood between them that spans the intersection of the two tops.

Attach the plywood with screws (no glue).

This method would prevent lateral and vertical movement at the tops intersection, provide for disassembly and the plywood would be hidden by the rails.
 

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My inclination would be to run the support along the front of the table on the left, not the way you have it. That would give a shorter distance for the span of the support and take the weight load directly to the 2 front legs of that table. I would then use a steel plate with 4 rows of screw holes, 2 rows on each side of the joining angle. The plate could then be nearly as long as the angle for maximum support. You could run supports, like you have, along the table on the right to eliminate sag on that table and butt those supports into the front of the support along the front of the table on the right. In that case the steel plate would go between those 2 supports. If you make these supports out of 1 1/2" x 2 1/2" hardwood, such as oak or ash, they will carry a heavy load (have the narrow edge against the under side of the table).

You could build it out of plywood, but if you have the money, I would suggest going to Menards or some other lumber company that sells butcher block and buying 6' x 2' (or whatever width you like) sections for making the tops. This will be spendy, but you will get the most bang for your buck. Here is a link to the Menards site/ butcher block tops...
http://www.menards.com/main/search.html?search=Butcher+block+counter+tops

Once you buy the tops, you can cut the angle with a circle saw and an edge guide clamped to the piece, like the one in this link...

http://www.woodmagazine.com/woodworking-tips/techniques/sawing-solutions/circular-saw/?page=5

For legs, you could buy something like these from Lowes...

http://www.lowes.com/pd_236121-952-...L=?Ns=p_product_qty_sales_dollar|1&facetInfo=

You would attach these legs with this hardware...

http://www.ebay.com/itm/like/330756657084?lpid=82

I know Lowes has the legs and they should have the key lock hardware. I know Menards has the butcher block and support material in oak (that will not match the butcher block very well). You may have to find other lumber suppliers for thick maple or if you get a wide butcher block you can rip off strips for supports underneath.

I hope this helps you get started.
 
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