Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
205 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I wanted a small desk to fit into a window alcove which limited the width. The result is this :



It is all in oak, with frame and panel sides to the cabinets. The top is solid oak t&g into a mitred outer frame. The top is glued at the front, free to move at the sides, and a small expansion gap at the back.




Metal slides as this will be a working piece of furniture and convenience is more important than tradition !




Quite pleased with the fit on the door - built over size and planed to fit.




The top was simple enough, but the big mitres were a bit challenging :



The mitres were cut on the TS using a jig running in the guide slot, but needed quite a bit of support at the outer ends as the pieces are quite long. Mortices cut with the router and slip tenons planed to fit :





I was quite pleased with them when glued up : (the gap is the back of the solid top to allow for x grain movement)



The raised panels for the sides were cut on the TS and refined with a shoulder plane - but they were pretty good straight off the table saw.







Here the first cabinet comes together, fitting the top and bottom rails front and back to the assemble frame and panel sides :




Simple drawers, no fancy dovetails here - havent got time !



Here it is prior to finishing :



Finish is water based stain, (grain raised and rubbed down before application) followed by carnauba wax.

Here it is in situ - it is quite small, but very useful, especially with a fully fitted filing cabinet style drawer on the right. The LH cupboard houses a commercial plastic multi drawer unit with stocks of paper, envelopes and other supplies. I know I should have made it in wood, but time was important and it is in use quicker this way. One day I'll replace the plastic !



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
205 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Beau travail Châtaignier. Very simple and elegant.
Thanks for the interest.

I note that you know how to spell Châtaignier correctly - you might be amused to know why my handle is spelt the way it is. When joining a french forum, I tried to use the normal spelling of the word (it's chestnut in french for the non-francophones) but someone had registered it first, so just for fun I tried different variants of the spelling. This was the first one I found free. Then, cos I have a terrible memory, I decided to use it everywhere so that I would not have to remember which forum was which for name spelling.

Why Châtaignier ? I had 30 acres of mixed woodland, mainly chestnut, so it seemed appropriate.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
303 Posts
Very nice ! Now load up on 1.5" and replace all of your doors ! Same style as the desk top. You know you want to ;-)
 

·
Old School
Joined
·
24,017 Posts
Well done indeed. Looks great, and I like Red Oak. Just a few tips...

You might think about a bit more clearances for the fit of the drawer fronts and doors. If you try to get them so tight, they can rub if you get an E&C condition.

The under mount white slides leave some of the drawer (about 3") in the cabinet, and that gets old hat for me. I always need something from the back.:laughing:

And last, but not really a big deal, is your drawer construction. You could use just rabbeted sides, and set the front and back in with glue. All the machining can be done on the TS, including the groove for the bottoms. For fastening, you can shoot from the front (or back) with a slight angle into the sides. When the false front goes on, you see no signs of fastening when the drawer is open. For shop or utility drawers, you can just brad nail from the sides into the front (and back).





.
 

·
Splinters
Joined
·
357 Posts
Great looking desk! However, I thought I seen my glasses in one of the pictures.... No wonder why I couldn't find them! Great job....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
205 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Well done indeed. Looks great, and I like Red Oak. Just a few tips...

You might think about a bit more clearances for the fit of the drawer fronts and doors. If you try to get them so tight, they can rub if you get an E&C condition.

The under mount white slides leave some of the drawer (about 3") in the cabinet, and that gets old hat for me. I always need something from the back.:laughing:

And last, but not really a big deal, is your drawer construction. You could use just rabbeted sides, and set the front and back in with glue. All the machining can be done on the TS, including the groove for the bottoms. For fastening, you can shoot from the front (or back) with a slight angle into the sides. When the false front goes on, you see no signs of fastening when the drawer is open. For shop or utility drawers, you can just brad nail from the sides into the front (and back).





.
Yes Cabinetman, I agree about the slides, the filing cabinet drawer is on fully extension telescopic slides and is much better. I wish now I'd done the same for the others, but hesitated because they are quite expensive.

No rubbing on doors and drawers so far... Other pieces I've done were similarly tight and I've never had a problem, but then my shop was in an old draughty barn in a river valley with quite high humidity so things tended to loosen up not tighten up even when built in mid winter.

The drawers were done 100% on the TS. Rabbets, grooves for the bottom etc, all done really fast. As for the dowels, they are as much for appearance as for strength, a few pins would work as well, but I was feeling guilty about not having done dovetails so wanted something decorative !
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top