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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi. I'm very new to the hobby of woodworking. Can someone explain the difference between woodworking plans and woodworking blueprints? Also, are "designs" the same as plans?
 

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I wood if I could.
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Hello and welcome. I don't know that I'd use the term "blueprints" in the context of woodworking plans but, yes, they are, in my mind, the same thing.

Design, however, is, well, the design. The style, the arrangement of elements that give a piece a specific look, style or feel. But I imagine you know what the word means in the general sense. It has that same meaning in woodworking. You can design your own projects of use some one else's design. The plans (or blueprints, if you prefer) are the diagrams and other records that convey the information required to reproduce a piece of work. The plans may or may not include a written description or step by step walk-through of the specific steps one might take to build a project.

So, plans convey a design to a potential builder or a given project. And "blueprint" can be used to refer to the diagrams that disclose such information as assembly details, dimensions and shapes of parts.
 

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Hi. I'm very new to the hobby of woodworking. Can someone explain the difference between woodworking plans and woodworking blueprints? Also, are "designs" the same as plans?
Well, I would say that they are pretty much the same depending on who done them, but blueprints always have all the dimensions on them as well as working drawings. Designs don't except for maybe references.

I would also say that "blueprints" are pretty much a thing of the past.
 
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Blueprints are (were) designs or plans that were copied (from draftsmen's drawings) with white lines on a blue background. Hence the name "blueprint." This was way before the use of CAD programs - the drawings were produced in ink, by hand, first on paper and later on mylar.

I think for what you will be doing the terms will be used interchangeably.
 

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I agree with minuteman on the blueprints. I worked at a shop where I drew up plans for a shop and then they sent them off and had blueprints made. The originals were kept in the office and the blueprint plans were sent out to the shop for fabrication. Sometimes though designs were the concept for a job without the specifics or dimensions of the project, sometimes just an artist renderings. The plans were the details attached to the design.
 

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Plans and blueprints are pretty much the same thing. In simple terms they tell you, in specific detail, how to build something. As noted the terms seem to be specific to different industries.

A design show/tells you the basic look/functionality of an item. It is the designer's concept of what he/she envisions.

George
 

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I'm going to go with the crowd for once. In my view, a design is a concept; sketches or diagrams with, at most, rough dimensions and sizing ("This should fit between the sofa and wall" or "about two feet, measure the whatsit for internal dimension") and may or may not be drawn to scale. Plans or blueprints will be drawn to scale, with the scale clearly marked, and all dimensions final. Ideally they will also include details of how each joint is assembled and a cut list.

As a note: a fair number of woodworkers these days are going back to the idea of working from a design, rather than a plan. Cut the largest (or most critical) pieces to size, and then just fit things to those, rather than trying to cut everything at once. I just built a sawbench that way, and while it's more complicated in some ways, it reduces the opportunities for screwing up measurements, which is where I most often go wrong.
 

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Blueprints are (were) designs or plans that were copied (from draftsmen's drawings) with white lines on a blue background. Hence the name "blueprint." This was way before the use of CAD programs - the drawings were produced in ink, by hand, first on paper and later on mylar.

I think for what you will be doing the terms will be used interchangeably.
Exactly.

Mike Darr
 

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I think everyone has given you good answers. I'll only add that blue prints actually start out on a yellowish paper, which is fed into a type of copier that uses ammonia vapors to transfer the lines from the original drawing to the blueprint. These machines usually had such horrible orders coming from them during the printing process that they had to be placed in specially vented rooms. Its the reaction to the ammonia that causes the finished product to turn blue with white lines and lettering. Hence the name blueprint.

They are much more durable than the hand drawn detail drawings. This is why Architects and manufacturers issued them to the builders or to the factory workers to actually make the thing that the Engineers or Designers want. The original drawings are never sent to the production floor or building site.

When everyone switched over to CAD systems, and laser printers became available that would print on large sized paper (24x36 inches and bigger) the need for blueprints went away. Now the original work is always safe either on a computer hard drive, or on whatever media the company uses for system backups and print outs of the drawings go to the field for production. Some companies have done away with the large drawings and print everything on 11x17 paper as printers that will accept that size can be purchased rather cheaply these days at staples rather than the several thousand dollars it takes to buy a full sized plotter for the 24x36 sizes.

Design is the thought process and initial sketches that go into making anything new. Usually they have very few (if any dimensions) or details. Detailed drawings are just that. Fully detailed with every possible dimension given to make the final assembly exactly as it was designed.

So...

Designs are basic drawings or sketches. They can be very detailed or just a concept sketched on a napkin over beers at the bar.
Detail (or working) Drawings are fully dimensioned drawings used to make a single part.
Plans include all the parts as assembled and a list of the hardware, finish materials, and assembly notes.
Blueprints are one of those museum pieces that have joined the ranks of slide rules, "T" squares, drawing boards, and triangles.
 

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You nailed it Johnie.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hi everyone! You guys are so amazing! Thank you for taking the time to post such detailed answers. So I've decided to dip my toe in the water and build or craft a wood tool box. It looks easy enough and I figure, since I'll be creating projects, I'll need a place to put my tools.

I'm really tempted to buy Tedswoodworking, but someone on here advised me not to. So I'm not sure where to get the plans. Any suggestions? Has anyone actually bought Tedswoodworking and can speak from experience?

Honestly, I'll be totally LOST if I try to even build this tool box without some sort of plan/design.
 

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I'm really tempted to buy Tedswoodworking, but someone on here advised me not to. So I'm not sure where to get the plans. Any suggestions? Has anyone actually bought Tedswoodworking and can speak from experience?

Honestly, I'll be totally LOST if I try to even build this tool box without some sort of plan/design.
You have already been advised not to get Ted's plans. But on several occasions, you keep bringing that site up. If there's no connection, why do it? My suggestion is do a rough sketch of what you want, post it, and we will tell you step by step on how to make it...FOR FREE.






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Shalisha,

 
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I wood if I could.
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The OP is sounding more and more like a spammer. I hope I'm wrong.

There is no Ted. And "Ted's" plans are an outright scam; a fraud. Anyone hawking "Ted's Woodworking Plans" is nothing more than a thieving scammer. If you are genuinely thinking about buying that: don't. If you are actually someone trying to sell them: move along. Ted and his ilk are unwelcome here.

Look at one or two of the smarmy creeps with Ted's Woodworking advertisement videos on YouTube and try to convince yourself it's legit. If you succeed you're an idiot.
 

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check this out for a "no plans needed" project

You hardly need any tools, just some clamps and a driver drill....
You will need to make the top however, but there are several ways you can do that... reclaimed wooden door, new or salvaged flooring, a glass top over a piece of artwork, new planks glued together ....

 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
You have already been advised not to get Ted's plans. But on several occasions, you keep bringing that site up. If there's no connection, why do it? My suggestion is do a rough sketch of what you want, post it, and we will tell you step by step on how to make it...FOR FREE.










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Cabinetman: I'm not going to argue with you or go back and forth with you as I think your comment is a bit antagonistic. However, although I know I was "advised" not to get Tedswoodworking plans, that person did not say WHY I shouldn't get it. On what basis? I could see if several people on here said it, but only one person said it. And even then, I would expect an explanation.

I don't understand your second sentence "If there's no connection...why do it?" Connection to what? It doesn't matter. What matters is I have a right to ask for what I want and I have a right to ask for clarity - even if other's don't like it.

I value other people's opinions on here, but I don't accept things blindly...Also, I don't go by one person's opinion - especially if they haven't given me specific reasons not to do something.

As for getting advice on here for free: I really like this forum and I'm learning a lot.

I am a visual person. I learn better with visual (colorful) instructions much better than written/verbal instructions. I don't know how to draw either. The best I can do is post a picture on this forum of the thing I want to make.

Now if you don't mind, please refrain from being antagonistic.

Thank you in advance for your cooperation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Steve. I just saw your post. This is the second time you've alluded to my being a spammer.

I didn't see your post before I posted what I posted to cabinetman. After this, I'm not going to answer you.

Again, you're making accusations, but you haven't given me specifics. How do you know Tedswoodworking plans are fake? Have you tried them? Have you purchased them? If you haven't or if anyone else hasn't purchased them, please don't give me your opinion on them since it comes across as ignorant. I'm looking for genuine help.

Also, I have better things to do with my time than lurk on forums.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
The OP is sounding more and more like a spammer. I hope I'm wrong.

There is no Ted. And "Ted's" plans are an outright scam; a fraud. Anyone hawking "Ted's Woodworking Plans" is nothing more than a thieving scammer. If you are genuinely thinking about buying that: don't. If you are actually someone trying to sell them: move along. Ted and his ilk are unwelcome here.

Look at one or two of the smarmy creeps with Ted's Woodworking advertisement videos on YouTube and try to convince yourself it's legit. If you succeed you're an idiot.

"...you're an idiot."

No, I'm not. I'm just a beginner - like YOU were at one time.
 

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Shalisha,

You were doing fine until you mentioned Ted's Plans. A lot of negative energy about that site as you observed.

If you are a beginner, you may find free plans may not have the detail you are looking for.

Consider looking at sites like Wood magazine, Fine Woodworking or ShopNotes. Find a project you want to build and get their plans, not very expensive.

http://www.shopnotes.com/

Woodsmith Shop also has plans, DVD and on some public TV stations a weekly show.

http://www.woodsmithshop.com/
 
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