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I'm going to try my hand at cabinetry by building a vanity for my bathroom. Then hoping to try out some kitchen cabinets down the road. I've been trying to do some research on cabinet making to figure out what materials I will need and also some different designs ideas. As of right now I think I am going to go with a face frame style cabinet for ease of building. Probably use pocket screws to fasten everything together.

So as far as I can tell I will need to make the front frame out of solid oak, the sides out of oak faced plywood(1/2" or 3/4", not sure), the back can be thin sheet material of some kind, the floor of the cabinet will be faced ply, and the toe kick. Anything I am missing or overlooking? Also should I use those triangle corner braces at the top of the cabinet or should I build a frame for the top, I've read about it being done both ways.

Also does anyone have advice on adding drawers in the vanity? Like how to mount the slides and then making the drawer and sizing it to the opening on the vanity?

Lots of questions but just trying to do as much planning as I can before I start since materials are kinda expensive and just want to make sure I design and get my measurements right. So any advice you might be able to share with a newbie attempting to build a cabinet will be much appreciated! Thanks for your help, Scott
 

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The size of the cabinet and location of the plumbing would be beneficial data to make suggestions for drawers. I would use 3/4" plywood for the sides and bottom, and 1/4" ply for the back.

The bottom can be fitted into dadoes in the sides, glued and clamped. The back can be rabbeted into the sides and the bottom. The cabinet can be made frameless. I would not use pocket screws. Triangle gussets can be used at the top corners of the carcass. A back rail should be installed to facilitate installing to the wall.






 

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The size of the cabinet and location of the plumbing would be beneficial data to make suggestions for drawers. I would use 3/4" plywood for the sides and bottom, and 1/4" ply for the back.

The bottom can be fitted into dadoes in the sides, glued and clamped. The back can be rabbeted into the sides and the bottom. The cabinet can be made frameless. I would not use pocket screws. Triangle gussets can be used at the top corners of the carcass. A back rail should be installed to facilitate installing to the wall.









Thanks for the advice cabinetman. I was just wondering if there was a rule of thumb as to the opening width/heigth vs. the drawer width/heigth? Why do you say no to pocket screws? How would I attach the front of the cabinet to the sides?

Thanks again, Scott
 

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Thanks for the advice cabinetman. I was just wondering if there was a rule of thumb as to the opening width/heigth vs. the drawer width/heigth? Why do you say no to pocket screws? How would I attach the front of the cabinet to the sides?

Thanks again, Scott
Figuring for drawers takes in consideration the spacing for existing plumbing, sink(s) basin and any dividers/framework necessary. There's no rule of thumb per se, except for what will look pleasing. Drawers in a bank are usually sized with small or equal sized height drawer fronts from the top down and/or the bottom drawer front being taller. Vanities usually don't have more than 4 vertical drawers in a bank.

When you ask about how to attach the front of the cabinet, I'm assuming you're meaning a face frame. You don't need a face frame. Cabinets can be built with or without face frames. My preference is without face frames. That method allows for more accessible/usable room in the cabinet, easier cleaning, better hinge selections, less work, and less materials.

When doing frameless cabinets, the front edge can be edged with solid wood strips from 1/8" to 3/4" thickness and just glued and clamped. You can also use a solid wood tape that has heat sensitive backing, and just iron it on and file off the edges.

As for cabinet construction and face frame attachment, I prefer not to use pocket screws. I find them to be a PITA to set up, not always efficient, and IMO a poor method of fastening. In reality, using a screw on an angle to fasten sections together directly can produce offset force making the joint prone to failure. That's just my experience. I had no problems assembling cabinets before there were pocket screws or biscuits.

Pocket screws could be an advantageous method in some circumstances. My assembly planning hopefully doesn't require a last minute panacea requiring a pocket screw.






 

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Scott you can just glue and clamp the face frame to the carcase as allot of people do. I go a little further and put a dado in the back of the frame and a rabbet on the front of the carcase. I glue and clamp then apply a few hidden brads. Cabinetman says that it's overkill and it may be but I learned that way and thats what I do. I have never seen a properly done glue joint fail, the surrounding wood usually fails before the glue does.

Just as Cabinetman likes frame less I prefer face frames for the look and I believe they are stronger. That said it's a personal choice.
 

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I am just in the beginning planning states of a bathroom vanity my self. I also intend to use face frame design, but will use glue vice pocket screws. Mine will have two center doors and 8 drawers. I think that the doors will go all the way to the top vice the way the drawing currently shows.

I am planning on raised panel design for all doors, the end and the 6 larger drawers. The two small drawers will use a router bit that simulates raised panel on solid wood front. As far as the drawers are concerned, at this time I am planning on old fashioned wood on wood. I tend not to like slides on a piece like this. Somehow I think it detracts.

I will use cherry throughout. Except for the interior pieces and the back and bottom. Will use 3/4" ply for the bottom and 1/4" for the back.

I am using this project as my first try at learning sketchup. So far I am pleased at the ability to develope dimensions without having to use my caluclator. Hopefully I will get where I can make complete representations as my skills devilope.

I am sure that there will be many changes before I get to a final design. And by that time hopefully my Sketchup skills will improve.
George
 

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The size of the cabinet and location of the plumbing would be beneficial data to make suggestions for drawers. I would use 3/4" plywood for the sides and bottom, and 1/4" ply for the back.

The bottom can be fitted into dadoes in the sides, glued and clamped. The back can be rabbeted into the sides and the bottom. The cabinet can be made frameless. I would not use pocket screws. Triangle gussets can be used at the top corners of the carcass. A back rail should be installed to facilitate installing to the wall.
Great advice cabinetman..wow..

Maybe you're fun of doing cabinet..:laughing:

Thanks!
 

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If these are being built at the location where they are to be installed I wouldn't waste time or money building modular cabinets unless you plan to take them with you when you move.
 

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If these are being built at the location where they are to be installed I wouldn't waste time or money building modular cabinets unless you plan to take them with you when you move.
Great plans ! I just wish this site had an automatic "Imperial to Metric" translator !:laughing:

I'm curious though with regards to the above quote. If someone wanted to take the vanity with them when they moved, wouldn't they be obligated to replace them with something? That would mean a whole new building project I figure. Is it common to do something like that in the US?

Diver D
 

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Is it common to do something like that in the US?
Not typically in the US. Cabinetry is usually so crappy it isn't worth it. I have seen some heirloom type furnishings however that were easily removed without destruction to walls etc.

I noticed on the real estate programs that many properties in European countries being shown without cabinetry. I assumed the cabinets were considered furnishings and taken upon vacating the premises.

As far as being "obligated to replace" I wouldn't think so if the vanity, once removed, didn't leave unfinished flooring or unpainted walls. In other words it isn't a permanent fixture.
 

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As for cabinet construction and face frame attachment, I prefer not to use pocket screws. I find them to be a PITA to set up, not always efficient, and IMO a poor method of fastening. In reality, using a screw on an angle to fasten sections together directly can produce offset force making the joint prone to failure. That's just my experience. I had no problems assembling cabinets before there were pocket screws or biscuits.

Pocket screws could be an advantageous method in some circumstances. My assembly planning hopefully doesn't require a last minute panacea requiring a pocket screw.
I use Pocket screws all the time. I attach face frames using tongue & groove with the pocket screws. For a bathroom vanity the screws for the cabinet partitions would be installed inside the drawer bank. They would not be visible from outside or when the drawers are opened. With a little thought on placement they should not be seen. These were all done using this method. You have to look hard & stick you head inside to find any pocket screws.
 

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Great plans ! I just wish this site had an automatic "Imperial to Metric" translator !:laughing:

I'm curious though with regards to the above quote. If someone wanted to take the vanity with them when they moved, wouldn't they be obligated to replace them with something? That would mean a whole new building project I figure. Is it common to do something like that in the US?

Diver D
In US you must have a complete bathroom. It would be hard to sell or even get financing without a complete bathroom or kitchen as far as sinks go. If you took your vanity with you, you would have to replace with another vanity or a pedestal sink. These items would be considered as part of the structure & would be expected to be included.
 
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