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I have a delta 22-580 13" two speed planer that stopped feeding.It's three years old and was mostly used on pine. I haven't tried taking it apart yet,figured I'd ask first.
 

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Jason W., Thanks for your reply.I found my owners manual called the nearest Delta repair shop,the planer had been in the cold and the feed rollers were too hard to grab the board.I heated the shop and it worked.
Thanks again,Rick C.
 

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If you haven't done it already, clean the feed rollers with naptha or alcohol, and wax the tables....in a pinch, wiping the tables with wax paper will do.
 

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If you haven't done it already, clean the feed rollers with naptha or alcohol, and wax the tables....in a pinch, wiping the tables with wax paper will do.
What type of wax would work best? I have a 13" bench top Jet that is becoming problematic. This is something I haven't tried yet.

Add: Good to hear you got the problem solved Rick.
 

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I clean the table (only) with thinner to get resin off of it..use fine steel wool on tough spots...the spray it with silicone spray. I crank the head up and clean the rollers. I use a small wire brush if needed. I do this when the machine is running and rollers are turning... however I DO NOT suggest you do this.:no:
 

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Don't - DO NOT - don't even think about spraying any surface of machinery that will touch the wood with silicone. It is evil, evil stuff. It is hard to get rid of and it will screw up most finishes. Use a quality butchers wax. You can get it at your local hardware store and sometimes you can find it at your grocery store. A can of it will last you a year or two and costs about $10. Wipe it on a cloth, rub the wax on all surfaces that the wood needs to slide on, wait for it to dry and buff it off with another cloth. Do this to your jointer, tablesaw, planer, shaper and router bases. Even on your hand planes.
 

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What type of wax would work best? I have a 13" bench top Jet that is becoming problematic. This is something I haven't tried yet.

Add: Good to hear you got the problem solved Rick.
Any pure paste wax with no silicone....Johnsons, Minwax, Mother's, etc.
 

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Don't - DO NOT - don't even think about spraying any surface of machinery that will touch the wood with silicone. It is evil, evil stuff. It is hard to get rid of and it will screw up most finishes.
I suppose you have evidence of this? Nevermind...of course you don't. But I will test your theory this week and be back to confirm or deny your claims. I have been using it for many moons (perhaps 30 years)with no recollection of "screwed up" finishes.
 

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mics: silicone most definitely will mess up finishes. I don't know if you'd get enough silicone from waxing your tools to cause messed up finishes, but in general it's a reasonable belief that staying away from silicone is a good idea.
 

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yeah I know...and hot water freezes faster and touching a toad give you warts.

"I'm not lying...I'm just writing fiction with my mouth" -Homer Simpson

The assertion was

Don't - DO NOT - don't even think about spraying any surface of machinery that will touch the wood with silicone. It is evil, evil stuff. It is hard to get rid of and it will screw up most finishes.
If spraying it on your equipment won't "mess up most finishes" then the assertion was erroneous. If something is a "reasonable belief" it should be easy to, at a minimum, illustrate the reasoning behind the belief.

silicone most definitely will mess up finishes.
As will most waxes and dust and water and adhesives and oil etc etc etc.
 

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I'll tell you what happened to me. I had a guy in the next bay over from me. These bays are separated by a sheetrock wall and are fully independent from each other. I was spraying a pigmented lacquer on a kitchen when I started to get fisheyes. This was the first time I had them so I didn't even know what was going on. I went on a few forums to find out that the likely cause for my fisheye problem was silicone contamination. Well, I don't use any silicone products so I was perplexed to why I was getting the fisheyes. The detailer in the next bay was spraying a silicone based tire shiner on the rubber surfaces in the cars. This was coming over into my bay by airflow through the walls and doors and everything else that separates us. I confirmed it by taking all of his products and spraying them on a chink of wood and finishing it. It showed up on this one particular product. So I found my culprit. So I was getting this contamination through the air with no physical contact at all. Silicone is a vile substance when it comes to finishing. I avoid it at all cost. It has cost me many thousands of dollars in my time trying to deal with this detailer. I cheered when he went out of business. And my fisheye problem went away with his departure.

You can keep using whatever products you wish. But one of these days the silicone is going to get you. And it is going to ruin your finish and cost you a lot of your time. I don't recommend using any silicone based products in the woodworking field.
 

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yeah I read the same story on another blog originating in australia.. same circumstances...same type of business doing the same spraying of automotive treatment...great adaptation though.
As I already stated I have been using spray silicone for 30 years. It's going to take more than questionable stories to convince me your statement about "spraying equipment that touches wood will mess up most finishes" is anything other than nonsense. "taking all of his products and spraying them on a chink of wood and finishing it" is nothing similar to using silicone on metal surfaces upon which wood will make contact. If you cannot understand the difference I doubt you will understand the point of this thread anyway.

http://www.woodworkforums.ubeaut.com.au/showthread.php?t=1095
We used to have a factory that was 2 doors from a car detailers. They used atomisers containing polish for dashboards and polishing vehicles.

2 ruined lacquer jobs later, you guessed it, we traced the fault to silicon in the car detailers. Wattyl sent a chemist and rep to find the problem. The spray painter down in factory 7 had 7 jobs ruined by the same thing.

They actually supply desiliconising drops so that you do not get "fisheye" in your finish because of silicon.
Small world ain't it.:no:
 

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So, you are calling me a liar. This is not a story. This is my experience. You can believe what ever you wish. I know what I know. And you will never catch me using silicone in my shop.
 

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Same thing will happen if you spray your silicone on some wood and spray lacquer on it. What does this have to do with applying paste wax or you silicon spray to the metal surface ?
 

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Interesting discussion, though it seems to be turning into an argument. I do suspect that most of concerns about using silicone on some tool surfaces are probably overstated. But there is no doubt either that extremely small amounts of silicone in most finishes will cause fisheye. In fact most sprayers warn the user either NEVER to use silicone in the sprayer, or to ALWAYS use it. Strange as that seems, of course if you put enough silicone in the finish, the “fish eye” becomes large enough so that it doesn’t appear anymore. I have always tried to keep all my sprayers free of silicone. It is true as a substance, it is extremely difficult to get rid of. Working with catalysts in fuel cells etc, one must be very careful never to let anything with silicone even remotely close to such a device, as the silicone will inevitably migrate and poison the catalyst. (Even silicone seal is an amazing product, one that is almost impossible to remove without very dangerous chemicals.) I think we would also agree that we don’t want to coat the wood with either silicone or wax, as the glue won’t stick and the finish probably won’t either, but fortunately wax doesn’t migrate as easily as silicone. That said, if a spray lubricant that contains some silicone is used on a machine, and let dry before wood is passed over the surface, I sort of doubt that most of us would have problems. But wax works so well, why take the chance. A bit of wax rubbed on the planer table sure makes it work a lot better.

Paul
 

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My $.02... as for coating the wood to give it better "tack", personally I'd never do it. My biggest frustration comes from the occasional sap on the lower bed... a board will stick fast to it, making the rollers work much harder, and requiring me to give the board a good shove to send it through. Letting a bed rust can have a similar effect. My advice would be to always keep that bed clean, rather than fiddle with the rollers' grip on the wood.
 

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I always keep the rollers and beds as clean as i can, and when not in use for awhile, i coat them with wd-40 to keep the rust away while not in use.I always clean them with naptha just before i use them, to remove any wd-40 that might be there from storage.This is just what works for me.:icon_smile:
 
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