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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Model # 36-649 1 1/2 HP Belt driven. 20x27 inch table with 30 inch rip capacity. I found a good deal on one and I want to know if there are any problems or drawbacks. Thanks.
 

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Old School
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Model # 36-649 1 1/2 HP Belt driven. 20x27 inch table with 30 inch rip capacity. I found a good deal on one and I want to know if there are any problems or drawbacks. Thanks.

For a contractors saw it is a good saw. With the proper blade you can get excellent results. Space wise, the motor hangs out the back. You could upgrade that saw with a "T" square type fence with a greater capacity, and set the saw up to be mobile if you need it. Parts are available for that model.

If you get a good deal on one, it's worth considering.






 

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I have what I think is a slightly older vintage (than that one) Delta contractor's saw and I like it very much. Obviously a full cabinet saw would be nicer, but I think mine does a good job especially for the money. I think contractor's saws are a good value. You can upgrade to a nice fence and add outfeed and side tables and have a very nice set-up.
 

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I have a Delta contractor saw and it has performed well. Dust collection is a little more difficult due to the open back but other than that, I'm extremely pleased with my saw.
 

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I have had a delta contractors saw for over 30 years and other than replacing the original belt with one of those separate link type belts, it has performed well.
Mike Hawkins
 

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I have a Delta contractor saw. I have had it for many years. It is fairly accurate. I have upgraded with a t type rip fence. If you use the delta t fence, it is not reccomended for a contractor saw with sheet metal extension tables. Only cast fences. I was able to put mine on my saw but it was difficult.

I am looking for a replacement cabinet saw right now.
 

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Been running mine for over 10 yrs at least 5 days a week. Still using the original drive belt!. I have the Unifence, once I got used to it I would not trade it for a Bies. Only major thing I have done is add a slider attachment, I wood be lost without it.:yes:
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Well, I picked it up. Thanks all for the input. The guy I bought it off of, bought it reconditioned a year ago and never used it, the rip fence and rails were still in the original box. I scored it for $150, pics to follow later on today.
 

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$150 is a heck of deal. The motor is worth close to that! Now you've got some benjiman' left over for a good blade or two! :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #10
$150 is a heck of deal. The motor is worth close to that! Now you've got some benjiman' left over for a good blade or two! :thumbsup:
On that note, what should I be looking for in blades for ALL of my saws. I pretty much have generic blades on my equipment thus far. My Ryobi 12" Miter Saw still has the original blade, and I bought a 60 tooth blade for my circular saw for cutting counter tops and MDF/OSB board. As with all things, I'm sure that not all blades are equal. Money is an issue, and just starting out I'm afraid that I'm kinda blade dumb.
 

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I have a Woodworker II blade for my saw and am very happy with it. It cuts very nicely on both rips and crosscuts in solid stock and plywood, and leaves very smooth edges on the cut pieces with mimimal splintering in veneer plywood. Not cheap though, they are around $100 on Amazon.
 

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I have the Delta 36-979 Left-tilt Contractors saw. I bought the power twist v-belt to keep down the vibration (which isn't terrible to begin with). I love my table saw. It came with the mobility kit and the dust funnel which are helpful. It's not my dream saw, but I wouldn't trade it for anything less. I use a Freud combination blade...never even used a delta blade so no opinion there.
 

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Check out your local Sears stores for Freud blades. They have been marking them down to some REALLY good prices. Plus they are great blades even at regular price. Amazon has a large selection.
 

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amazon is where I buy blades as well...cheaper than most other places
 

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On that note, what should I be looking for in blades for ALL of my saws. I pretty much have generic blades on my equipment thus far. My Ryobi 12" Miter Saw still has the original blade, and I bought a 60 tooth blade for my circular saw for cutting counter tops and MDF/OSB board. As with all things, I'm sure that not all blades are equal. Money is an issue, and just starting out I'm afraid that I'm kinda blade dumb.
Blade selection and final setup ultimately determine how well your saw performs, and can make a big difference. Be sure the alignment is spot on, be sure your throat insert is flat, flush, and rigid, using a ZCI improves the cut, and check that the saw's runout and vibration is very low. Wood that's been flattened and straightened stands a better chance of cutting well.

The best blade values tend to change with the sale prices, and the best blade choice changes with the task at hand. The types of materials you use should influence your blade choice(s). Stick with the highest quality you can manage. Keep in mind that many manufacturers have multiple quality levels...some lines from the same brand are ok, while some are outstanding, so some research is in order if you want to buy strictly on brand name reputation. Ridge Carbide, Infinity, Freud's Premier line, and Forrest are among the very best made. Amana, Tenryu, CMT, Systimatic, DeWalt/Delta, Leitz, also have some really fine blades. Some cheaper blades will cut fine for a brief period but dull more quickly....it's usually less expensive in the long run to buy the higher quality, and certainly improves your chances of getting top performance.

Places like Holbren, Ebay, Amazon, and the classifieds on wwing forums are often a good place to grab a bargain on a good blade. Your table saw will work fine in most woods using a full kerf blade, but a good thin kerf will pose less resistance and strain on the motor...especially in thick wood. (I would be far less likely to choose a thin kerf blade in a 12" because the span is larger making it more prone to flexing.) Using one decent general purpose/combo type blade in your TS can allow you to get by with just one blade, but tends to offer more limited performance in the extreme range of thick ripping and ultra fine crosscuts/sheetgoods. If you tend to do alot of sheet goods and need finer cuts, lean toward more teeth. If you do alot of ripping in hardwoods, lean towards fewer teeth.

For clean cuts, sheetgoods, excellent crosscuts, one of the better values on sale was the Freud LU88R010 60T...it'll work well as a general purpose blade and rips well up to ~ 6/4". The Infinity 010-060 is also outstanding, but leans more toward cleaner cutting, ply, fine crosscuts, yet still rips well to ~ 5/4"....a terrific choice if you work with alot of ply. If you were to mate either of those with a decent 24T TK ripper like the LU87, DW7124PT, Infinity 010-124, CMT, Leitz, or Amana AGE, you'd be pretty well covered. If you can spend in the $150 range, the 30T WWII TK and Infinity 010-060 are an impressive tandem that compliment each other's strengths and weaknesses well, yet both are versatile enough to leave in the saw with very good results in most applications. If you really need to be frugal, the Freud Avanti TK406 (60T) or TK906 (50T) would mate well to a good TK ripper.

Here's an article that helps explain some of the technical parameters. Saw Blades 101. Here's a comparison I updated in 2007.

Let me know if you have any specific questions.

HTH,
Scott
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Blade selection and final setup ultimately determine how well your saw performs, and can make a big difference. Be sure the alignment is spot on, be sure your throat insert is flat, flush, and rigid, using a ZCI improves the cut, and check that the saw's runout and vibration is very low. Wood that's been flattened and straightened stands a better chance of cutting well.

The best blade values tend to change with the sale prices, and the best blade choice changes with the task at hand. The types of materials you use should influence your blade choice(s). Stick with the highest quality you can manage. Keep in mind that many manufacturers have multiple quality levels...some lines from the same brand are ok, while some are outstanding, so some research is in order if you want to buy strictly on brand name reputation. Ridge Carbide, Infinity, Freud's Premier line, and Forrest are among the very best made. Amana, Tenryu, CMT, Systimatic, DeWalt/Delta, Leitz, also have some really fine blades. Some cheaper blades will cut fine for a brief period but dull more quickly....it's usually less expensive in the long run to buy the higher quality, and certainly improves your chances of getting top performance.

Places like Holbren, Ebay, Amazon, and the classifieds on wwing forums are often a good place to grab a bargain on a good blade. Your table saw will work fine in most woods using a full kerf blade, but a good thin kerf will pose less resistance and strain on the motor...especially in thick wood. (I would be far less likely to choose a thin kerf blade in a 12" because the span is larger making it more prone to flexing.) Using one decent general purpose/combo type blade in your TS can allow you to get by with just one blade, but tends to offer more limited performance in the extreme range of thick ripping and ultra fine crosscuts/sheetgoods. If you tend to do alot of sheet goods and need finer cuts, lean toward more teeth. If you do alot of ripping in hardwoods, lean towards fewer teeth.

For clean cuts, sheetgoods, excellent crosscuts, one of the better values on sale was the Freud LU88R010 60T...it'll work well as a general purpose blade and rips well up to ~ 6/4". The Infinity 010-060 is also outstanding, but leans more toward cleaner cutting, ply, fine crosscuts, yet still rips well to ~ 5/4"....a terrific choice if you work with alot of ply. If you were to mate either of those with a decent 24T TK ripper like the LU87, DW7124PT, Infinity 010-124, CMT, Leitz, or Amana AGE, you'd be pretty well covered. If you can spend in the $150 range, the 30T WWII TK and Infinity 010-060 are an impressive tandem that compliment each other's strengths and weaknesses well, yet both are versatile enough to leave in the saw with very good results in most applications. If you really need to be frugal, the Freud Avanti TK406 (60T) or TK906 (50T) would mate well to a good TK ripper.

Here's an article that helps explain some of the technical parameters. Saw Blades 101. Here's a comparison I updated in 2007.

Let me know if you have any specific questions.

HTH,
Scott
WOW, that was alot of information. Thanks. I think that I might go with two seperate Freud LU model blades, one for ripping and one for crosscutting.
 

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Fellow woodworkers hello there. I have a 10 inch construction table saw. It has a 1 hp motor n I'm told it's a nice saw. I put a new belt on the shaft and tried ripping a 2 by 4 and it couldent even finish 1 board. The belts groves were striped flat. I'm wondering why. The board was actually fairly dry. Probably not kiln dry but been under cover for quite some time. My blades were bran new. I had s 40 tooth n a true ripping blade with 6 teeth or something like that. The shaft turns fine. Dads a mechinest n he says it's good. I was told the piece could be squeezing the blade witch slows down the motor witch guides the belt out of the groves then when in put pressure again it's rubbing the groves flat. What can i do here to either maniluliate the board or beef up the drive system.
Thanks again for all the help
 

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There are many variables that can cause problems when ripping a long board on a table saw.
Construction grade lumber cuts different from kiln dried hardwoods. A 24 tooth carbide blade might work best on rough construction lumber.
The pinching or closing of the saw kerf can be eliminated by stopping the cut at about 24" from the start and driving a wedge into the cut to hold the kerf open. Then re-start your cut.
A 1 HP motor is not a strong motor for a table saw. It may work well, but slow. If fed too quickly, you can stop the blade.
The belt should not slip. If it is slipping, something needs adjustment. Maybe as easy as applying a belt dressing or moving the motor back on it's mount. If your belt is moving on the pulley, it may be out of alignment.
 
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