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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I need some advice I am going to attempt to build a wooden deck table. I want a real sturdy table (weight is not an issue). I am thinking of a plywood top with a rustic looking border, with some kind of tile inlay for the surface, haven't figured out the exact design yet. I have seen pictures of numerous tables with 6"x6" horizontal brace for the "feet" across the bottom and a 6"x6" leg (on each end) for vertical leg. My questions are, do you think 6"x6" is to beefy for legs/braces for a deck table? Do you think I am going to have issues with expanding/contracting wood due to climate change? Is tile a good idea for the top or should I be avoiding that? I am very new to woodworking so any tips or hints would be appreciated!
 

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I had a really nice deck table. The seasonal weather destroyed it. That was really discouraging.
Now? Freight pallets here are 40" x 48". 2x4 canted 15 degrees for legs. Some braces for stability.
Added 1x2 in between the 1x4 topping. The rain can dribble through. Made 2 of them. Nice table cloths for the always dry and clean finishing. They can stay outside until they rot. Then, I'll make two more.

Elsewhere in the back yard are 6 more of those tables, the pallets cut down to 30x48. Two by the shed for potted cuttings, two on the grass for rough wood work, two in the garden for tools, sticks, etc. My only mistake was that I should have made the tables 10 years ago.
 

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Wow its good idea that you make the deck table which is good one idea but what is the progress in your work hope you will brief me more about the new update about the table....
 

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My questions are, do you think 6"x6" is to beefy for legs/braces for a deck table? Do you think I am going to have issues with expanding/contracting wood due to climate change? Is tile a good idea for the top or should I be avoiding that?
For me, it doesn't matter if it's too beefy or not. If it looks cool, do it. As for the tiles on the top, if you coat the wood underneath the tile with an epoxy paint, it should last longer. Maybe one of the ww guru's here with more experience than me would have a better idea. And contraction / expansion is the nature of the wood beast, I don't believe there's anyway to avoid that.
 

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One of my very first projects was building a coffee table out of solid oak. It was a heavy beast.

The legs were 4x4's cut on the diagonal so they would fit in the inside corners of a 2x4 rectangular corner mitered frame (or side skirt). Then I used 3/4 plywood for the inner sub-top that was set down for tile thickness depth. Held in the plywood just using cleats underneath. Everything was screwed and glued. Overall inside frame dimensions was based on the number of even tile rows...etc. While it was inside, I'm sure you could come up with something that would do fine outside. Use something for the frame like IPE or some other outdoor exotic wood. For the tile support, how about a material sturdy, but will allow for drainage.
 
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