Woodworking Talk banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi:

For the purposes of simplification, if not explanation, I am gluing a plastic sheet-similar to a plastic table cloth to plywood.

Before beginning this project I tested that using wood glue to bond the two surfaces would work well and it did.

Again, without going into details, I have need to address imperfections in the plywood surface and plan on using DAP's plastic wood product to smooth out these imperfections. Suffice it to say that I will allow the product to fully dry and sand it flush.

That said, once dry and sanded, do you guys/gals believe that this product will hold wood glue with similar strength to wood itself? If not, do you know of a product similar in purpose to Plastic Wood that will?

I couldn't find the answer here, on the internet, or with DAP customer service.

I will of course try it first regardless of the well informed opinions I'm sure many of you have as it regards working with wood.

Thanks.
 

·
Super Moderator
Retired Craftsman
Joined
·
4,748 Posts
just out of curiosity, I would like to know more about
your project and even see photos, if available.
when I think of wood glue (TiteBond) and plastic, my mind
automatically switches to the "not a good idea" mode.
but - it is depending on the project and its use.

.

.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Okay sir. Fair enough. Years ago, as I've published on this forum in the past, I became mesmerized with this table.

https://hometone.com/grand-central-coffee-table-folds-up-into-tiny-table.html



Unable to find suitable material to create its hinges and covering with, that was thin, enormously strong, not subject to expansion, and not subject to weakness at its hinge points--unable to have its inventors disclose their chosen material (which I understand was flimsy by those who visited this "discover build") I made it with two butler hinges at each hinge point, top and bottom.

Years later, while walking the aisles at a Home Depot I came across synthetic roof underlayment material.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Grip-Rite-48-in-x-250-ft-1000-sq-ft-Synthetic-Roofing-Underlayment-SLG4250LWE/310301708

This stuff does not stretch, it cuts well and is ridiculously strong, thin too, which is perfect as hinge material.

But would it hold wood glue I asked. So I took a piece of it and spanned two pieces of plywood of equal thickness butted up to each other, gluing it down with wood glue.

To my contentment the bond is so strong that I can't bend the wood in the direction of the side that doesn't have the underlayment. A couple of further tests with Flex Seal brand rubberized spray paint found it perfect at covering the top of the underlayment material and the folding points.

What I'd like to do now is remove the butler hinges, fill them in with Plastic Wood, and actually do this table as originally designed with the underlayment material.

I'd like know the underlayment bonds similarly with wood as it does plastic wood. Rest assured, the plastic sheeting is NOT the issue as it pertains to wood glue holding it in place against the plywood surface. The bond is super strong.

Most of the glue points will be between plywood and the underlayment except for a couple of "U" shaped places near the hinge points now filled in by Plastic Wood in place of the removed butler hinges.

I hope that makes the background clearer if not more long winded.
 

·
Super Moderator
Retired Craftsman
Joined
·
4,748 Posts
Arbee, now I fully understand your project (and your question).
I just had a new roof put on my house and the roofer laid down
the synthetic underlayment and it is indeed bulletproof !!
if I were doing your project, I would be very comfortable removing
the metal hinges and filling the cavity with Bondo.
there is so much surface material surrounding the patched area that
it probably would not need any glue at all to work as it is designed to.
of course, experiment as you stated to ensure compatibility with
the Bondo and the glue that you are using.
hope this helps you a little in your quest.
looking forward to seeing your finished project.

.

.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you for your kind, prompt, and informative reply. : - )
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,604 Posts
I think the wood glue would probably stick to the DAP Plastic Wood; my concern would be that the Plastic Wood would come loose from the plywood or that it would shrink and show a low spot through the underlayment. I think puttying the hinge mortise cavity and getting a solid, clean surface may be a pain. I’d consider gluing a piece of wood into the mortise for the hinge. Even if you have to use some filler around the perimeter, it will be easier than puttying the entire cavity.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Thank you for your thoughts redeared and Quickstep.

One option I have is to create the table top again from scratch. This would eliminate my need to have to use anything to fill the mortises I made for the butler hinges in the original table top, and preserve my original table top work should any new endeavors with this synthetic underlayment material and a new table top prove to be a "train wreck."

That said, and getting back to my original idea, what do people think of my creating my own filling for the mortising I did for the butler hinges by combining saw dust and wood glue to fill the mortise holes for the butler hinges on the original table top?

I don't care what the finished product looks like, as long as it's, after sanding, flush with the table top. I say this because the aforementioned underlayment material will be covering my "filling in the mortise hole" endeavors.

Thanks.

(For what it's worth I've tried to upload here a picture of the original table, its folded up version: which looks a little bit like a baseball home plate with one of its 5 sides a circular, not straight segment, and two test pieces of wood connected on top with the synthetic underlayment glued on, and Flex Seal brand rubberized spray paint on it. The bottom side of the test piece also has this underlayment glued on but it is cut at the hinge point, as would be required. : - )

Not shown the table legs are adjustable in height (coffee versus dining table) and the 2 outer legs fold in (not shown) so as to not protrude beyond the "baseball diamond" shape of the folded table. Neodymium magnets currently keep things in place.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
268 Posts
I wouldn't use filler for something like that. Glue a patch in made out of wood.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,604 Posts
“what do people think of my creating my own filling for the mortising I did for the butler hinges by combining saw dust and wood glue to fill the mortise holes”

It will shrink a lot, showing through your underlayment material.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
...duly noted about the shrinking sawdust/wood glue combination. Thanks for that Quickstep.

I decided yesterday to make another circular table top from scratch, preserving the original. With a router and the jig already made, it wasn't that hard to do.

This makes the issue of this thread now not only moot, but preserves the existing table top, even in its hardly perfect form, should my new endeavors become a train wreck.

Knowing me, the first two attempts at something often are--much that I wish otherwise and try to think of all possible things to go wrong beforehand.

"All builds are discovery builds. "

If nothing else, this thread has educated me on the pros and cons of various approaches to patching wood. I thank all for that. : - )
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top