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What does everybody think of "cypress" for turning?
I have the opportunity to pick some up and I was wondering if I should load up or leave it alone. The tree was cut about a week ago.

Thank you
Dick
 

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It's easy to turn/sand, try some --- you might like it. Nice light colored wood.
Haven't turned it green though.
 

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Howdy Rodbuster,

Purdy wood, just make certain your tools are sharp.

I'm a big fan of Australian Cypress, if you have the ability to cull through the knotty stuff. Impossible for larger projects.



Buck.



Buck.
 

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I've worked with Monterey cypress , ( we call it Macrocarpa here ) , it turns well .
As said above , sharp tools or tearout is the result .
Not done it green either .


It can be a problem for some folks are who allergic to it , family members too.
 

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Manuka Jock said;


"...It can be a problem for some folks are who allergic to it , family members too..."

Excellent point pard', glad you remembered to mention it.




Buck.
 

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Alan Sweet
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In my case, the cypress that I have gotten has

not been consistent. Within the same board, it was solid for turning and funky in other parts. Need sharp tools.
 

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I made 48 pens from 74 year old cypress (planking from a speed boat) for a boat restorer for his customer. You really need sharp tools. I used a skew to turn them. When I finished them the wood was very soft and even my finger would make a mark. Not sure I would use it for a bowl. The grain was very tight.
 

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Yep , some of the sapwood can be soft .
On the bright side, due to it's delicate colours it makes good ornaments .
The heartwood on the other hand is very robust , and stable .
And it's colours can be really vibrant .

PS.
From a milling point of view , (Monterey Cypress) logs that have been down for some years in a drying environment are as easy to mill as freshly felled stock.
The log pictured was one of those .
 

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