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I've tried cutting raised panels on my Delta Unisaw and each time end up burning the cut to the point that visible smoke is raised. I've just visually checked parallelism of blade to fence and it looks ok. And I'm using a high fence. Help!!:thumbdown:
 

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bzguy
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For the blade to not heat up the gullets are supposed to protrude through the top of the cut.
Try making a shallow face cut first so the strips of wood fall away as you make the deep angled cut.
This "square/90 degrees to the face" cut will look like a knife-cut panel.
Using a rip blade with large gullets rather than a finish blade will work better, either way you will he doing a lot of sanding.
 

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I was also thinking you might have the wrong type of blade in your saw... if not, try doing your york in 2 cuts rather then 1.
 

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I made face cuts first to denote the raised section of the panel then cut to the bottom of the face cut. I used an 11* angle. I too was getting some burn when using a 40tpi blade, I went to a new (read sharp) 60tpi blade and no more burn. Also as was mentioned above, try making two cuts instead of one, although I was able to make the cut in a single pass. I hope you have good dust collection because it sure make a mess! There is a raised panel cabinet in my pictures.
 

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Really underground garage
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Probably shouldn't respond....oh well.

O.K.,once you've gotten the right blade.The TS is tuned enough.You have your safety "ears on".And everything else you can think of in the realm of precision and safety.

You still have one glowing problem.Any vibration or resonance is going straight into your panel.So even when you get all the things right in the first paragraph....and even when you've eliminated the "burn".You are still going to have chatter marks that will have to be "finished" out.Basically what you need is a vibration sink.Yes,just like a heat sink inside your computer.It's a heavy backer plate/vertical "sled" of some fashion that your panel affixes to.It needs to be dang heavy....like cast iron heavy.

This is why those old Delta tennon jigs/fixtures are so desirable,vs cheapie light weight imports.It's this heavy frame that soaks up the vibrations.Need an example?Sure you do.....Take a 2'x2'x3/4" pce of plywood and smack the crap out of it.Now take a 2'x2'x4" pce of concrete and smack it.One is going to resonate,one is going to pretty much,thud.

So,yes...get on top of your blade selection.Yes,get serious with safety.But until you back-up that panel with a vibration sink you're going down a one way street.Best of luck...and be careful.
 

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where's my table saw?
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a smoking cut is sign of two things

The blade:
Either the blade has too many teeth... the blade is gummed up and should be cleaned, or the blade is dull.

The saw:
The blade and the fence are not parallel either to each other or the miter slot. One or both may need to be aligned properly. The blade/arbor is the most involved, depending on your saw type, cabinet or contractor.

:smile:
 
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Procrastinator (For now.)
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Here's my two cents on the matter. It could also be your technique. Using a high fence is important and you are doing that. When feeding the board it is very important to keep the board firmly against the fence. The slightest wobble or movement will cause a burn. Just as important is the rate or speed in which you push the board through. Pushing the board through too slowly will cause a burn especially on hard woods. Feed the board as fast and smoothly as you can without forcing it, letting the blade and the saw do the work. Attached is a pic of some doors I made on my Ridgid 3650 using a 60 tooth blade. The wood is pine. (I also made the mouldings and the chair in the pic.)
 

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