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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm beginning the process of building my new shop addition and will need to lay the flooring soon. That means lots and lots of pressure treated 2x8s. What kind of blade should I use to cut pressure treated, presuming I DON'T expect the blade to last the cuttings. It's my understanding that pressure treated lumber is heck on saw blades because of the metallic compounds in it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
This is the one time I wish I bought the sliding compound miter saw instead of the vanilla compound miter saw. Every 2x8 will have to be flipped to cut all the way. Although i guess I can use a circular saw - I just hate using one for some reason, probably because I couldn't cut a straight line freehand to save my life.
 

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Old School
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Don't freehand. Use a framing square to guide the circular saw.

And why lift all your lumber to a miter saw? Simply carry the light little circular saw to the pieces of lumber wherever they lay.
 

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In History is the Future
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Willie T said:
Don't freehand. Use a framing square to guide the circular saw.

And why lift all your lumber to a miter saw? Simply carry the light little circular saw to the pieces of lumber wherever they lay.
That's right... This came up a couple months ago... A speed sqaure will make for easy accurite 90's and 45's...

~tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It may be a moot point - at 12x6 the building is perfect for a 2x8x12' with a few odd sized to tie it together. But I'll take a look at a speed square - no reason not to learn a new technique.
 

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wood hacker
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do it this way and it will be super fast, measure your lumber, and set your speed square. then when ya mark all the rest of the lumber mark where your speed square goes, lay the square make the cut,

layout all your lumber at once and then cut it all, its alot quicker than having to go back and forth,
 

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This is the one time I wish I bought the sliding compound miter saw instead of the vanilla compound miter saw. Every 2x8 will have to be flipped to cut all the way. Although i guess I can use a circular saw - I just hate using one for some reason, probably because I couldn't cut a straight line freehand to save my life.
I wouldnt put my miter saw through the abuse of cutting PT framing lumber. :no:

I think you may be missing a golden opportunity here. Put your current miter saw through the abuse, which will then justify the need for a new, sliding compound miter saw. :yes:
 

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Not trying to push a product here. However, since you say you will be cutting with a circ saw, I'd recommend the Diablo Demo Demon 7 1/4". It'll stand up to the abuse you'll be throwing at it.
 

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What's the deal with treated being so abusive on blades? I've never noticed anything like that. Am I missing something?
 

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Scotty D
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What's the deal with treated being so abusive on blades? I've never noticed anything like that. Am I missing something?

I've ripped miles and miles of PT, and never noticed it being any harder on blades either. :smile:
 

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John
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I've ripped miles and miles of PT, and never noticed it being any harder on blades either. :smile:
Same here, PT is generally wet and soft but I haven't found it particular abrasive. MDF, particle board and plywood, yes:thumbdown:
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Depending upon which type you get PT is loaded with metallic compounds, as well as the chemical soup that it is injected with - which of course is why it's heavy and soggy when cut. It may not be as bad as hardiplank or the like - but it definitely will eat a blade.

But that brings up a point, mdntrdr, why did you post this comment: "I wouldnt put my miter saw through the abuse of cutting PT framing lumber."
if you don't believe it to be worse than normal lumber?
 

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klr650 said:
Depending upon which type you get PT is loaded with metallic compounds, as well as the chemical soup that it is injected with - which of course is why it's heavy and soggy when cut. It may not be as bad as hardiplank or the like - but it definitely will eat a blade.

But that brings up a point, mdntrdr, why did you post this comment: "I wouldnt put my miter saw through the abuse of cutting PT framing lumber."
if you don't believe it to be worse than normal lumber?
If he's like me, it's because he has too much invested in his saw and blades and built in table and fine tuning to drag it out to a construction site and throw 6x8 LOGS on it... I no longer do rough construction for a living and don't have a saw dedicated to it now... 7 1/4", 9" circ & 15amp recip saws works just fine for me :)

~tom
 

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only thing I've really noticed that you have to watch for with pressure treated is the fact that it is usually wet, it can bind or kick back more than dry wood if you aren't carefull
 

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Scotty D
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But that brings up a point, mdntrdr, why did you post this comment: "I wouldnt put my miter saw through the abuse of cutting PT framing lumber."
if you don't believe it to be worse than normal lumber?

Cutting any 2 X framing lumber with a miter saw puts undo stress on a saw that should be reserved for precision cuts IMO. :smile:
 

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it is much easier on a saw to cut purpleheart or birdseye maple than pine :yes: :laughing: :thumbsup:
 

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I haven't found PT lumber to be particularly hard to cut or hard on equipment. It's much easier in both areas than, say, Ipe.

The worst thing abourt PT is that it is often wet and heavy.

Also, the presence of a metallic compound doesn't imply in any way that you are cutting metal or anything necessarily abrasive.
 
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