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I'm trying to install a few European pre hanged doors and need some advise. The doors will be installed over newly laid hardwood floor and the existing clearance between bottom of the door and floor will be more than I desire - 1 1/2". I'd like to trim the jambs and this is what I'm uncertain about. Since the jambs are finished - their insides, the visible part, look like a finished cabinet. I'd like to trim the jambs, so the clearance will be 3/4". What is the best way to get this done without damaging the jambs or any other part of the doors? I thought of removing the door entirely and then use miter saw cut the ends to the desired length. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
 

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You are over thinking this-----use a Skill Saw with a fine toothed blade--cut from the outside with the door still in the jambs---check your floor --if it is not level--adjust the cuts so the jamb legs sit on the floor with the head jamb level.
 

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where's my table saw?
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pre hung doors

They can be trimmed in place using a oscillating "multi tool" from Rockwell, Harbor Freight, etc and a flush trim blade on a 3/4" spacer placed on the floor.



You can use a flush trim or back saw also:

http://www.amazon.com/Stanley-15-25...id=1405424616&sr=1-21&keywords=flush+cut+saws


OR, leave the doors on and the spacers in place and trim them using a circular saw and a fine tooth blade. Lay them horizontally and cut the 3/4" off from the bottom end. Secure them from tipping by leaning and clamping them against a bench or other stable object.
 

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Old School
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If you are having a trim carpenter install the doors/jambs, he/she should be well versed on how to do a professional installation. If you are doing the installation, and the doors are hung in the jamb, remove the door, and cut the bottoms of the jamb legs as needed. That could be done with several types of hand saws cutting from the finished side. Or, if you can get access to use/rent a jamb saw, that makes quick work of it.

If you are experienced with trim work and woodworking you could disassemble the jambs and cut the legs on a miter saw, and then reassemble the jambs. If there are any thresholds involved account for their height.










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Not sure what a European prehung door is, but if it is the same as the prehung doors I am familiar with I would lay it flat on some saw horses tape the jam and casing where it is to be cut with some painters tape. Mark the cut with a pencil then score the line with a utility knife. Once all that is done I would take a fine toothed handsaw and cut just on the waste side of the score mark.


If you have central air conditioning or heat, you may want to balance your need to have less of a gap with the heating and cooling systems need to exchange the air in the room. It is common in my area for this gap to be the only path for the air to return the ac/furnace.
 

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In hanging interior doors, some floors may have carpet, some vinyl, some hardwood and some may have throw rugs. You keep all the door headers the same height to accommodate any of these floors mentioned above. Normally, about 1 1/4" is left from the subfloor to the door bottom for carpeted rooms. When you look down a hallway, all the headers should be the same height.

I've never heard of European pre-hung doors. Doors in the US can be pre-hung. They may have split jambs that have the casings on them or they may be solid jambs with no splits or casings. Either way, the height is figured for the thickest flooring.

Do not remove the door. Place the unit in the opening, check the margin around the door, then place a level on the header. It's always possible the floor is not perfectly level. To keep the headers level, you may have to cut a little more off one leg than the other. You shim the jamb legs so the header is level, then scribe the jamb legs to the floor accordingly.

Traditionally, all the doors, jambs and baseboard are installed before the hardwood flooring. This means the floor installers have to be pretty good at fitting. Today, most installers have little skills. They put in the doors and base after the floor. As a few years pass, the baseboard shrinks, leaving a visible gap. Door jambs often don't fit tightly and visible gaps can be seen there, too. This is where scribing the jamb legs to the floor is important.

There are several ways you can cut the jambs. The easiest is to leave everything together and cut the jamb from the backside. Just stand the unit up on it's side. Some use a circular saw, others a jig saw. A handsaw can also be used but you normally cut from the face, with a handsaw, not the back. Most pre-hungs are now set up for the 1 1/4" gap and often no alterations are needed. Not only do you need to clear rugs but you also want some ventilation, particularly with closets. I would be careful about leaving too small a gap under the door. Many modern doors are hollow and don't have enough meat at the bottom to cut the door without having to make an insert plug. Better to avoid cutting doors.
 

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John
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If I wanted a power tool, I would agree with the oscillating tool. I have a little Marples pull saw I got at Home Depot for about $15 that does a great job on stuff like that. With either, I would likely tape a piece of scrap along the intended cut line to use as a guide.
 

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All you have to do is trim the jamb off cutting it from the outside with a circular saw. I assume the door is finished too and needs to be trimmed also. What I normally do is put several strips of masking tape across the bottom of the door to protect it from the getting scratched by the base of the saw. Then I mark a line where the cut will be and score the line with a utility knife and a straight edge and make the cut with a circular saw against a straight edge. Cutting it with a knife first reduces the chance of chipping.
 

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I've never installed a finished jamb that the door wasn't finished also. Cutting 1 1/2" off the jamb is a lot which would suggest the door probably would have to be cut also. I think that is what steve meant.
I'm sure Steve appreciates your constant back up, but he can answer for himself.






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where's my table saw?
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The doors will be installed over newly laid hardwood floor and the existing clearance between bottom of the door and floor will be more than I desire - 1 1/2"
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I'd like to trim the jambs, so the clearance will be 3/4". .
Trim amount is 3/4" AFAICT
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thank you everyone for your responses. I'm far from being a pro and I'm working on remodeling of my house. I would consider myself pretty handy, but I'm far from being as knowledgeable in woodworking aspects as most of you are. These doors is quite different in many respects - first (and I'm not trying to accomplish this particular aspect) I won't be able to trim the door itself since it has a glass insert in it. The installation of the door is quite different too. Here is a link where you can see the door I'm trying to install - http://www.milanodoors.com/catalog/interior-doors/doors/milano-340-wenge-interior-door/. I worry that I won't be able to cut down the jambs in such a way, that the visible part of the leg should not have any tear outs and the cut has to be perfectly straight. I'm not sure is I can accomplish the same result using oscillating tool. 1 1/2" clearance is a bit much to my liking, the door will be installed over hardwood floor ,but I do understand that the door needs to have a clearance for proper AC / heat ventilation. Once again thank you for your input, much appreciated!
 

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Old School
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Thank you everyone for your responses. I'm far from being a pro and I'm working on remodeling of my house. I would consider myself pretty handy, but I'm far from being as knowledgeable in woodworking aspects as most of you are. These doors is quite different in many respects - first (and I'm not trying to accomplish this particular aspect) I won't be able to trim the door itself since it has a glass insert in it. The installation of the door is quite different too. Here is a link where you can see the door I'm trying to install - http://www.milanodoors.com/catalog/interior-doors/doors/milano-340-wenge-interior-door/. I worry that I won't be able to cut down the jambs in such a way, that the visible part of the leg should not have any tear outs and the cut has to be perfectly straight. I'm not sure is I can accomplish the same result using oscillating tool. 1 1/2" clearance is a bit much to my liking, the door will be installed over hardwood floor ,but I do understand that the door needs to have a clearance for proper AC / heat ventilation. Once again thank you for your input, much appreciated!
In reading the installation instructions for an interior door, it sounds like if you have experience installing doors you should have no problem if you follow the steps.






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