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I'm need to make 6 dado cuts in 3/4 MDF and was wondering if I could accomplish this with a Rotozip. Would you just make multiple passes with a 5/32 rotozip bit, or try and fit in a 3/4" dado bit meant for a router? Thanks for any help
 

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OLD DUDE AT WORK
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Use a router, I don't think a Rotozip will power a 3/4" bit. That was a joke, right?;)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Ha, I should have mentioned, I'm pretty new to woodworking in general. I don't have access to a router, and don't want to purchase one for such a little project.
 

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John
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I'm need to make 6 dado cuts in 3/4 MDF and was wondering if I could accomplish this with a Rotozip. Would you just make multiple passes with a 5/32 rotozip bit, or try and fit in a 3/4" dado bit meant for a router? Thanks for any help
Well, you can probably accomplish it but I doubt it will be pretty. To begin with, rotozip bits are designed to dissipate the heat through the tip, requiring the tip to be exposed, which means a through cut, which a dado is not. I got that info from Bosch when I contemplated doing some concrete work with their Duralast bit... I gave up the idea. I think you would be burning and breaking bits on a fairly regular basis.
Also, the rotozip is not the most controllable rotary tool I've used. The base and any guide attachments I've been able to acquire have all been pretty flimsy.
If your ZIP will take 1/4" shanks, you could get a 1/4 or 3/8" straight router bit and take very light cuts which should solve the bit issue but will be a load on the tool itself.
Many ways to cut dados though. If through dados (edge to edge), multiple passes on a table saw works fine.
Best recommendation I can think of though; Wal-Mart is selling a Skil plunge router for about $60. Not top of the line as routers go but will do the job, and many other jobs; edge profiling, mortising, trimming... etc. Likely significantly less money than the rotozip bits should you go that way. About the same money as replacing the ZIP. :smile:
IMO, a router should be among about the top 3 or 4 tools to start a wood shop. The versatility is amazing.
 

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its called the Craftsman 9.5 AMP 1 3/4 HP Fixed Base Router exact same one included in the craftsmen router table model number 28182 snd is on sale for 89.99 right now and is a great router and table set i know because i got it a couple months ago and it works great
 

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Old School
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Well, you can probably accomplish it but I doubt it will be pretty. To begin with, rotozip bits are designed to dissipate the heat through the tip, requiring the tip to be exposed, which means a through cut, which a dado is not. I got that info from Bosch when I contemplated doing some concrete work with their Duralast bit... I gave up the idea. I think you would be burning and breaking bits on a fairly regular basis.
Also, the rotozip is not the most controllable rotary tool I've used. The base and any guide attachments I've been able to acquire have all been pretty flimsy.
If your ZIP will take 1/4" shanks, you could get a 1/4 or 3/8" straight router bit and take very light cuts which should solve the bit issue but will be a load on the tool itself.
Many ways to cut dados though. If through dados (edge to edge), multiple passes on a table saw works fine.
Best recommendation I can think of though; Wal-Mart is selling a Skil plunge router for about $60. Not top of the line as routers go but will do the job, and many other jobs; edge profiling, mortising, trimming... etc. Likely significantly less money than the rotozip bits should you go that way. About the same money as replacing the ZIP. :smile:
IMO, a router should be among about the top 3 or 4 tools to start a wood shop. The versatility is amazing.
+1. Some procedures can be done with alternative methods, but deciding on which method should take you to the best choice, which may be the safest choice. I've always made a habit if I could afford it was to buy a tool bigger (more power, larger capacity) than I think I need.








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I have the Craftsman versipn of the rotozip. I comes with both standard and plunge bases and I use 1/4 standard router bits in it. It has a chuck for both the 1/4" and 1/8".

I could do the described job. I would just have to take it "slow and easy." Do not bite off too big a slot on any pass.

'George
 
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