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Hi...I'm new here...could someone please help me? I'm trying to cut a series of wave-like curves in a piece of laminate that will then be glued to a vertical surface for a backsplash. I'm using a jigsaw with a plastic laminate blade, but am having trouble properly supporting the laminate so I can make a clean cut. Should I mount it to a sacrificial board with double stick tape or spray adhesive? I don't want to gum up the blade...thanks for any and all suggestions for other methods or tools I could try.
 

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I would sandwich it between to sheets of scrap ply.
You can move the clamps as you go.

A router would be best, cut a pattern and use a
laminate cutter to follow the pattern.

BTW;

Welcome to the madhouse.
 

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i second scoring with a knife. No need to wast a piece of board. Once you have your first cut the rest will follow the line almost on their own. might take 10 cuts so be patient and don't rush it :thumbsup:
 

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Speaking as one who has done a lot of mat cutting, I will say that it takes a steady hand, a very sharp knife and perhaps extraordinary patience to stay on a line and still cut through. And those are straight lines on cardboard.

I would never say it can't be done, but it seems like it would be a very time consuming process, especially if the laminate in question is very hard.
 

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Hi...I'm new here...could someone please help me? I'm trying to cut a series of wave-like curves in a piece of laminate that will then be glued to a vertical surface for a backsplash. I'm using a jigsaw with a plastic laminate blade, but am having trouble properly supporting the laminate so I can make a clean cut. Should I mount it to a sacrificial board with double stick tape or spray adhesive? I don't want to gum up the blade...thanks for any and all suggestions for other methods or tools I could try.
From what you are describing, I think that what you are doing is adding this piece as an additional decorative freeform 'overlay' and not conforming to the actual backsplash which is probably rectangular - more or less.
If I am corect, I think you are on the right track. However, I am not sure if double sided tape or spray adhesive will hold well enough for the form not to slip while flush routing.
I would use normal contact cement to attach the laminate to plywood of MDF. When finished, all you have to do is start at one corner and work some lacquer thinner under the surface. Once started and not being cheap with the lacquer thinner, the laminate will peel right off. When you want to reglue into the final position, you can easily clean off the excess contact cement with laquer thinner. If you will be using contact cement as your final adhesive, a thorough cleanup is not necessary. Just add a thin layer of contact cement over the existine.
As for getting adhesive on your cutting blade, this should not be a concern as it is A) NEVER avoidable and B) eassily cleaned with lacquer thinner. Totoal cleaning time...15 to 30 seconds.
The advantages of making a sacrificail board is that you have the opportunity to work on your sacrificial piece until it is exactly the right shape the way you want it and your flush trimmer bit will give you an exact copy. If you go with the 'cut and trim to shape' idea it will probably take much much longer. You will have to cut closely with some kind of cutter blade, then use a file and sandpaper to get it to final shape. While doing this you risk damage to the surface by the file , the sandpaper, vice and clamping marks to the laminate and possibly cracking and breaking the whole thing by an accidental bend while hand tooling to shape.

Heck, I may be misinterpretting what you are trying to do and am getting this all wrong.
 

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From what you are describing, I think that what you are doing is adding this piece as an additional decorative freeform 'overlay' and not conforming to the actual backsplash which is probably rectangular - more or less.
If I am corect, I think you are on the right track. However, I am not sure if double sided tape or spray adhesive will hold well enough for the form not to slip while flush routing.
I would use normal contact cement to attach the laminate to plywood of MDF. When finished, all you have to do is start at one corner and work some lacquer thinner under the surface. Once started and not being cheap with the lacquer thinner, the laminate will peel right off. When you want to reglue into the final position, you can easily clean off the excess contact cement with laquer thinner. If you will be using contact cement as your final adhesive, a thorough cleanup is not necessary. Just add a thin layer of contact cement over the existine.
As for getting adhesive on your cutting blade, this should not be a concern as it is A) NEVER avoidable and B) eassily cleaned with lacquer thinner. Totoal cleaning time...15 to 30 seconds.
The advantages of making a sacrificail board is that you have the opportunity to work on your sacrificial piece until it is exactly the right shape the way you want it and your flush trimmer bit will give you an exact copy. If you go with the 'cut and trim to shape' idea it will probably take much much longer. You will have to cut closely with some kind of cutter blade, then use a file and sandpaper to get it to final shape. While doing this you risk damage to the surface by the file , the sandpaper, vice and clamping marks to the laminate and possibly cracking and breaking the whole thing by an accidental bend while hand tooling to shape.

Heck, I may be misinterpretting what you are trying to do and am getting this all wrong.
how can i say this without sounding like an ass :blink: this is a terrible idea. did that work :laughing: there is no need to glue the laminate to the board... a couple of clamps will work just fine. a sacrificial board would be a good idea if you have some scrap kicking around, if not a knife is how i do it every time :thumbsup:
 

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Chris

There is no danger of sounding like an ass. We all have different ways of doing things. I have only tried this once and it worked fine. Ungluing plastic laminate is a simple and fast process. As a normal process, I would avoid putting clamps on plastic laminate and if it is a long thin shape there would not be room for a flush trim router to follow the sacrificial shape which is in effect a template.
Its a matter of preference. I would rather spend time on a template than knife cutting and shaping the laminate.
 

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yeah actually as i gave it some more thought, this would be a good way to do it if you had the time to let it dry. i am just always in work mode - get it done as quick as i can. deadlines never allow for anything but the fastest way of doing something :shifty:
 
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