Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Someone told me that the best finish for them is extra virgin olive oil. Is this true or is it someone just talking nonsense?
 

·
Trytore Member
Joined
·
2,763 Posts
Greedo, where have you been? Off to shoot Han again? :laughing:

Nice to hear from you. I think you will want something that doesn't go rancid - as olive oil will. Mineral oil is what many people use. I've used a mineral oil/beeswax mix that I like. You can make it yourself and I believe there are "recipes" on the forum here. Warm it up, apply liberally and let soak for 15 minutes then wipe off. First time do that about three times then buff with a soft cloth or even paper towel.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
7,222 Posts
Best would perhaps be hotly debated, at least it has been before.

In the US people use unscented mineral oil frequently sold as Butcher Block oil. I would not use olive oil. It could go off.

I do not have UK site link, but to give you the idea here is a US link.
http://www.woodcraft.com/product/2003233/1773/butcher-block-oil-pint-saf.aspx

As Shop Dad mentioned, you could also use beeswax.

This is not right or wrong, rather preference.

I prefer to use oil on a chopping board, I feel it penetrates better.

I use beeswax on my bowls.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,160 Posts
No, you don't want to use any type of vegetable or food oil. They will ultimately go rancid.

An excellent treatment for wooden food preparation surfaces like cutting boards and butcher blocks is a mixture of mineral oil and either paraffin or beeswax. This is what is used on many commercial wood surfaces. It will last longer and be more protective than just mineral oil. Mineral oil can be found in most supermarkets in the pharmacy section or in a true pharmacy. Paraffin is found in the canning section of the store or in a hardware store.

Heat the oil in a double boiler and shave in some wax. The exact proportions are not critical--a 5-6 parts of oil to one part of wax will work fine. Stir the mixture until all the wax is liquefied. Apply the mixture heavily and let it set 10-12 hours or overnight. Next day do it again and continue until the wood will no longer absorb the finish. Let it set for 10-12 hours and then lightly scrape off any excess. Then buff it with a rag.

Reapply whenever the wood begins to look dry.

Never put a wood board in the dishwasher and don't soak it in dishwater for long periods.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
I don't believe olive oil goes rancid when applied to a cutting board. I believe it cures before that can even happen as I have never, nor can I find any evidence of such an event even happening.

If I had to treat a cutting board - and I don't because it is totally not necessary-(clean with lemon or vinager solution) I would absolutely avoid mineral oil. It's a petroleum based by product! People like it though because it dries quickly- but so does walnut oil.

Use walnut oil or fractionated coconut oil--- very stable- and if your cutting meat on it and it has not cured- oils like to marry each other and with the meat you will have bacteria... Hence the lemon or vinegar treatment only.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top