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I finally glued up the final assembly of a cutting board i started a while back. Never got around to build me table saw sled. Today i did. I made an end grain cutting board. Can i pass it through my planer. In the back of my mind im thinking no but want to check.
 

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crosseyed & dyslexic
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Man you are asking for a world of hurt, but I have heard of guys running one thru a planer taking very shallow cuts. I wouldn't do it myself. Before I bought a drum sander I used my belt sander.

But I'm no expert and there's plenty of them on here :thumbsup:
 

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I'm with Crusader, bad idea. I've read of people being seriously hurt when a chunk broke off and destroyed the planer. But others on here claim to do it w/o issue.
 

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I've done it (once) but I know it's not a recommended process. I ran an approximately 10"x12" rock maple end grain cutting board through my DeWalt 733. I took very light cuts (1/128") and glued a sacrificial strip across the back edge of the board. The planer was doing some serious screaming (and I stood well back) but it worked. The only problem was that the sacrificial strip broke off and chipped the rear edge, so I just trimmed it a bit shorter.

I've heard the horror stories, too, but it worked for me on that project. Next time I do an end-grain cutting board, I'm going to level it with a router ski jig setup. Here's a video showing one in use: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VGx9_FOC3sM&feature=youtu.be and here's a thread showing several designs: http://www.routerforums.com/jigs-fixtures/37449-plywood-ski-jig.html

That's probably a safer route (ha-ha) to get that cutting board level.

Bill
 

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I have run end-grain rock maple glueups through a thickness planer on a number of projects. It takes:

1. A sturdy planer-I probably wouldn't try it with light weight table top units,

2. Sharp knives,

3. Light cuts, and

4. Some provision for preventing tearout on the trailing edge.

As with any operation, if you don't think you can do it safely, don't do it.
 

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I just use a low angle block plane with a sharp blade. Takes about 5-10 minutes per side to level it out after the final glueup and poor alignment due to ****ty cauls. Then hit it with 100-120-150-220 and call it a day.

The part that always gets me is sanding the sides that are face grain and how quickly 220 goes through it, but how slowly it works through the end grain on top. Sadness overcomes.
 
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