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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I wanted to ask this question in case my thinking is a bit dangerous. Don't want to get hurt

I have a board that I want to cut a wedge out of, and then glue another wedge in place from a different species. Like the below picture

Wood Plywood Hardwood Floor Flooring

This guy used a jointer but I don't like the inconsistent cut. I was going to angle my table saw blade and cut that way.

Any safer ways to do this? Useful jigs?

Thanks for any help you can give
 

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John
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I wanted to ask this question in case my thinking is a bit dangerous. Don't want to get hurt

I have a board that I want to cut a wedge out of, and then glue another wedge in place from a different species. Like the below picture

View attachment 82429

This guy used a jointer but I don't like the inconsistent cut. I was going to angle my table saw blade and cut that way.

Any safer ways to do this? Useful jigs?

Thanks for any help you can give
Hi Chris - I think the table saw would be my weapon of choice for that job. There are plans for jigs to help hold the board vertical. They would be similar to a tenoning jig or raised panel jig. Look up "raising panels on a table saw" or similar should get a bunch of hits.:smile:

EDIT - Here's one: http://www.newwoodworker.com/pnlrasjig.html
 

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where's my table saw?
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Use a jig

Your issue may be the maximum height of cut on your tablesaw... about 3" or so. If your wedge is greater than that you may have to use a jointer or a large bandsaw...
 

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I wanted to ask this question in case my thinking is a bit dangerous. Don't want to get hurt

I have a board that I want to cut a wedge out of, and then glue another wedge in place from a different species. Like the below picture

View attachment 82429

This guy used a jointer but I don't like the inconsistent cut. I was going to angle my table saw blade and cut that way.

Any safer ways to do this? Useful jigs?

Thanks for any help you can give
Your concern over the safety of this operation is certainly justified. It could be dangerous if not done right. If I were doing it I would just tilt the table on the band saw and run the work piece against the fence. But that my not give you an satisfactory gluing surface (may not be smooth or straight enough) which I would clean up with a smoothing plane. Yes, a hand plane.

Bret
 

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Old School
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Along with the methods already mentioned, properly set up, a jointer should do a good job. You could do the bevel with a router and a jig (rails for the base to ride on), set up for the angle of bevel. You may need to clean the edge, and if you are versed with hand planes as Bret suggested, that would work. Or, you could use a block sander.






.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for all of the quick replies!!

I agree that a band saw wont get me a good finish, and I am horrible with hand planes....So I will build a Jig and use the table saw.

Thanks again
 

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where's my table saw?
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I can build that jig with 5 pieces .....

haha... The jig weighs more than the saw. :laughing:
Yah, but that's not even a real table saw. It's a table with a saw built into it. I have to give the guy credit for working with what was on hand. I'd do it a bit different and start off with an angle that's closer to the desired and then work with titling the blade to get it on.

It was really the concept I was trying to show. :yes:

When making a jig there is always a choice of hanging it or riding off the fence if you have a rectangular tube like a Biesemeyer, OR sliding in the miter slots, like a tenoning jig. For long pieces I'm in the ridin' the fence crowd since there more support over a longer length. `:smile:
 
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