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Discussion Starter #1
Alright, so I am a bit lost when it comes to cut a board thickness wise. Most of the lumber at my local supplier is all 1inch or thicker. Which isn't really an issue except for the fact that its kind of hard to use thick boards for small box projects. Anyone have any tips or videos I can look at to help me with this?
 

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where's my table saw?
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Got a bandsaw?

 

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Old School
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I didnt think about the router idea, that still makes a alot of waste of the board though.
If you are reducing the board thickness by any method, that makes a lot of waste of the board. If you go from 1" to 3/4", that's 25% isn't it?

If you buy your lumber at a lumberyard, that has planing capabilities, or wide belt sanding, that sure beats scrubbing with a handplane. Maybe just have them do it.






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where's my table saw?
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I guess a router is a hand tool ...

I didnt think about the router idea, that still makes a alot of waste of the board though.
I did post this in the Hand Tools section didn't I?!
Obviously the only way to resaw a board into 2 halves using hand tools is a hand saw or bow saw, so I didn't restate the obvious, just asked a question. Lasers, water jets, sawmills and bandsaws are out....apparently by definition. Sorry for the confusion, if any evolved. ;) bill
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hmmmm alright so a totally different ?

Alright now just an off the wall ? which is more versatile and would be a better first buy if you only have around 600. A table saw or a band saw? I'm starting to think bandsaw unless I get into working with larger things such as plywood. Any ideas?
 

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Alright, so I am a bit lost when it comes to cut a board thickness wise. Most of the lumber at my local supplier is all 1inch or thicker. Which isn't really an issue except for the fact that its kind of hard to use thick boards for small box projects. Anyone have any tips or videos I can look at to help me with this?
For smaller boards (1x4, maybe 1x6) in softwoods like pine, hand resawing isn't all THAT hard. Make sure your saw is sharp, and go to work. Look here for some pictorial advice. I've done some using a Shark pull-saw, and it's worked out OK. It is time consuming, though. I did a roughly 1' long piece of 1x4, ending up with a 1/2" piece and a 1/4" piece (more or less) in about 5 minutes. Hardwood will take a lot longer... I tried it on a piece of red oak, and decided the bandsaw would be a lot faster. I don't have a good rip saw, though... that might have made a difference.

Alright now just an off the wall ? which is more versatile and would be a better first buy if you only have around 600. A table saw or a band saw? I'm starting to think bandsaw unless I get into working with larger things such as plywood. Any ideas?
Most people here will tell you to buy a table saw. I won't say they're wrong, but I don't necessarily agree. I do almost all my rip-cutting with a circular saw (or a hand saw, recently), because setting up my table saw is a pain -- I just can't afford the space right now to leave it set up permanently. The band saw has a smaller footprint, and does some things (like resawing and curved cuts) that are a pain to do with any hand saw I have. I also prefer cutting plywood with a circular saw, unless I need to make a bunch of cuts of exactly the same width... then it's easier on the table saw.

I'd say if you're looking to resaw and make curved cuts in pre-dimensioned lumber, go with the band saw. If you want to make easy and accurate long rip cuts, go with a table saw. The table saw also makes dados a LOT easier... that's really the one place that I don't even really think about alternatives, I just go set up the table saw. A lot of it comes down to personal preference, really.
 

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where's my table saw?
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BS vs TS

Alright now just an off the wall ? which is more versatile and would be a better first buy if you only have around 600. A table saw or a band saw? I'm starting to think bandsaw unless I get into working with larger things such as plywood. Any ideas?
Depends on your woodworking needs. A table saw will allow you to work with large panels from sheet goods like plywood accurately, something a bandsaw can't do.
The both can do some of the same things like rip, cross cut and to some extent resaw.
Bands saws excel on curves and resawing thick stock...6"' or more. Tablesaws don't have the blade height capacity beyond 3" for a 10" saw. Two cuts will give you 6" for a resaw.

My opinion is they are tied for first place...photo finish.:eek:
A properly tuned bandsaw is very versatile and will do a lot. If you are making furniture with curves and tenons and resawing thicker boards, I'd go that way. You can clean up the cuts with hand planes and sanding. If you want to build cabinets and work with plywood I'd get the table saw. ;) bill
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Ok, I think I will be going the handsaw route. If I did get something it would be a bs though. Anyways thank you for the advise now to find a good ripping saw for resizing!
 

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Just a thought, but a lot of online lumber yards sell thin craft hardwoods in various thicknesses, such is this guy...

http://walllumber.com/thin.asp

Wouldn't it be a lot easier to just buy thinner wood right from the start instead of messing around with re-sawwing and planing 4/4 lumber?
 

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If I needed thin wood for small projects I would order it from walllumber.com.

In fact that is exactly what I have done in the past to make jewel boxes.

In the past when I have needed to resaw wood I have gone to the base and used the big bandsaw at the hobby shop. Unfortunately they have now closed that hobby shop so I will have to find an alternative.

George

George
 

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Just this weekend on the Woodwright's Shop - Roy Underhill was showing the proper technique for handsaw ripping....

I think it would be well worth a couple views.... His comment was that you have to constantly flip the board over - saw a bit from the "Top" of the kerf side, then flip it and saw it from the "Bottom" of the kerf... This way - the saw tracks in the groove you just cut on the bottom... All you gotta do is to stay reasonably close to your line on the top....

Easy peasy.... ;)

Thanks
 

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truckjohn said:
Just this weekend on the Woodwright's Shop - Roy Underhill was showing the proper technique for handsaw ripping....

I think it would be well worth a couple views.... His comment was that you have to constantly flip the board over - saw a bit from the "Top" of the kerf side, then flip it and saw it from the "Bottom" of the kerf... This way - the saw tracks in the groove you just cut on the bottom... All you gotta do is to stay reasonably close to your line on the top....

Easy peasy.... ;)

Thanks
I've only had to do this before I figured out that my saws were set for too wide a kerf. After I took a sharpening stone to the sides of the teeth, and reduced the set once the saw is "in the groove" it tracks amazingly straight.
 
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