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Tilt your tablesaw/bandsaw/circular saw/jig saw/hand saw to 45 degrees and go to it?

Greg
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
With the board only being 2" wide I'm hesitant.

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With that cut, I would be more concerned with length than width. If you plan to cut the board in 1/2, you still have nearly an 3/4ths of an inch of material on either side of the blade. This is plenty and should not be a problem.

Set your fence to the desired distance from the blade (obviously tip it 45 degrees) and use feather boards and hold downs similar to this. Also use push sticks or blocks like these or these. Do a google search for feather boards, hold downs, push sticks and push blocks to get an idea of what is out there, and use what fits your work and tools.

Alternatively, you could cut a 45 degree cut on one edge of the board and then rip off the opposing edge with the blade straight. This would be marginally safer, but result in more wasted wood. You would use feather boards, hold downs, push sticks and push blocks in the same manner as described above.

With hold downs and push sticks, this shouldn't be a problem on a reasonably equipped table saw. The work piece is held down and your hands are well away from the blade.

Greg
 

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With that cut, I would be more concerned with length than width. If you plan to cut the board in 1/2, you still have nearly an 3/4ths of an inch of material on either side of the blade. This is plenty and should not be a problem.

Set your fence to the desired distance from the blade (obviously tip it 45 degrees) and use feather boards and hold downs similar to this. Also use push sticks or blocks like these or these. Do a google search for feather boards, hold downs, push sticks and push blocks to get an idea of what is out there, and use what fits your work and tools.

Alternatively, you could cut a 45 degree cut on one edge of the board and then rip off the opposing edge with the blade straight. This would be marginally safer, but result in more wasted wood. You would use feather boards, hold downs, push sticks and push blocks in the same manner as described above.

With hold downs and push sticks, this shouldn't be a problem on a reasonably equipped table saw. The work piece is held down and your hands are well away from the blade.

Greg
He might only have dimensional lumber (1x3).




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where's my table saw?
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tablesaw safety

ripping a 45 degree bevel means having the fence on the "correct" side of the blade. The correct side will depend whether your blade tilts right or left, left being the most common.

On a left tilt saw, the fence should be on the right side of the blade.
This is because the "keeper" piece must NOT be trapped between the blade, table and fence. Later in this he is going to do exactly that, not recommended by me however, but he uses a GRIPPER pushing device set up for the operation to hold both the keeper and the cutoff.

 

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where's my table saw?
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it may be actually 1" x 2"

cutting 45 lenghtwise on a 1x2...How?


I'm at a loss.

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It really doesn't make much difference. The process will be the same, the safety aspect only slightly greater with the less wide the board.
Proper push blocks and hold downs will all be in the same position and the pass will be identical on a table saw.

A circular saw will be a whole 'nother discussion.
 
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