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I am looking to replace the molding in our kitchen after a remodel so that it matches the rest of the molding in our home again.

I am looking for a router bit that matches the profile with the step and round overs. Knowing that is probably a pipe dream, does anyone have any suggestions on how I can achieve a matching profile. Thanks in advance!

It is a 3/4" thick piece, with ~3/8" of the depth taken off on top, down ~1 3/8" from the top. The upper potion is not beveled.

I obviously plan on just using 1x8's. It doesn't have to be 100% exact to the molding that I'm trying to replicate, since it will be in a different room. But the closer, the better!

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Ancient Termite
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For lack of better words, it looks like single step about 1 ¼ in height and ¼ deep.

A sacrificial fence on the table saw. Use the Rockler clamps to hold the fence w/o interfering with the cut. A dado blade set to 1 ¼ height and a ¼ wide of cut. I would glue a 1 by ¼ strip after the cut area to the fence as an aid to keeping long 1 x 8 in even contact.

Run your 1 x 8 through on edge and against the fence. Use a push pad to hold the 1 x 8 against the fence over the cut area. The beauty of this method is that if you screw up, just back up and recut the same area.
 

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it may be the camera angle, but it appears that there may be angled cuts on the step and even the top??? maybe not...
 

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Jack of too many trades..
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How old is your house? That baseboard looks identical to the baseboard in my previous 1927 home. I've seen that style baseboard in houses ranging from 1905 to at least 1930. My 1927 house featured a "cap" piece on the top of that baseboard. It was very nice looking. The base on mine was 5-1/2" - so a bit shorter that your 7-1/4. Either way, it's made from standard dimensional lumber.

To your question (and agreeing with John Smith) I was able to reproduce that baseboard profile on my cabinet saw. However... there is a 'cone-shaped" router bit that can make that same angle in a single pass, but the TS approach is probably the most economical.
 
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