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I just built this curved front vanity cabinet for a friend. It's knotty pine.

Furniture Wood Table Desk Chest


I like using curved pieces. The doors were very easy. The only curve-laminated pieces were the rails, all other parts were flat. The shop made v-grooved panels fit nicely into a slightly over-width slots in the stiles and rails. I did not want to get all involved in creating a jig to cut the tenons on the curved rails so I just used the fence with the band saw and eyeballed the right angle to hold the rails. I must be livin right because the fit perfect on the first try. (believe me it doesn't always go that smooth).

A fun project.

Bret
 

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Lola Ranch said:
I just built this curved front vanity cabinet for a friend. It's knotty pine.

I like using curved pieces. The doors were very easy. The only curve-laminated pieces were the rails, all other parts were flat. The shop made v-grooved panels fit nicely into a slightly over-width slots in the stiles and rails. I did not want to get all involved in creating a jig to cut the tenons on the curved rails so I just used the fence with the band saw and eyeballed the right angle to hold the rails. I must be livin right because the fit perfect on the first try. (believe me it doesn't always go that smooth).

A fun project.

Bret
Great looking vanity. Your friend has to be very happy. Thanks for sharing.
 

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I just built this curved front vanity cabinet for a friend. It's knotty pine.

View attachment 76768

The only curve-laminated pieces were the rails, all other parts were flat.

Bret
Pine never looked so good.:smile: Looks great, what about a finish? What did you do for the curve on the sink panel (false drawer front)?







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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I guess I wasn't too clear in my description. The Sink front panel and also the face frame parts were curve-laminated as well as the door rails. These were made by re-sawing and surface planing 1/8" thick plys and clamping between a curved form cut from a glue-lam beam scrap.

We are in discussion about how to finish it. My friend says he wants to stain it. I told him if wants to do that then he'll have to do it himself. He said it's his wife who wants the stain and he was going to have her do it, ha. I've never had much luck staining pine with satisfaction.

Bret
 

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We are in discussion about how to finish it. My friend says he wants to stain it. I told him if wants to do that then he'll have to do it himself. He said it's his wife who wants the stain and he was going to have her do it, ha. I've never had much luck staining pine with satisfaction.

Bret
That should be interesting. Have your friend take some pictures.:yes:



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35 or so years ago,me and the 'ole man did a whole series or lot of pine furniture.

Am still looking for the book....its here somewhere,duh.It was one of my first dedicated furniture books.It was the inspiration for our run of furniture.The title is,or something like: Raised panel furniture from Eastern shore va/nc.

Googling will take you to a much later book....which is more complete,but that isn't the one I'm looking for.The book we have is much smaller,no way near as comprehensive.....BUT,has some very interesting examples nonetheless.

We were using Puritan Pine,minwax stain....two lite coats.We'd sit the pcs out in full Sun for several days.Then we were using a brushing varnish to complete.Won't go into the "distressing" part as it's a little fakey.....but hey,they sold very well.
 

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First, sweet vanity! I love the curved sinkbase.
As for finishing, I've had some success with spraying pine as a finish. Not a whole lot of luck staining per se. If you have the ability to spray, throw on a light coat of shellac, followed by another coat of stain dissolved in alcohol after the first layer has dried. The stain/alcohol coat dissolves slightly into the first coat. Give it some time to set up and retouch areas that may need more coloring. You can build up colors in between coats of shellac to give more depth or to alter color, starting with a light color and then toning with darker colors. HTH
 
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