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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had this idea that maybe once a week or two I could post whatever is going on on my one of my workbenches

PB260186.jpg

PB260189.jpg

Today it's this rocking chair I'm building out of Douglas Fir. Why fir? Because I had it and it was free. I also wanted to see how a fir rocking chair holds up. Fir is fairly strong but cracks and splits sometimes. To prevent that I re-sawed and re-laminated almost all the components. I think it will be quite sturdy, I'm going to gift it to a friend for his 60th BD. So I'll be able to keep an eye on it.

The chair was formerly part of some large beams that was the framing for an old warehouse that was a furniture store in our town. The store caught fire, it was a spectacular fire, huge flames. A friend of mine salvaged some of the un-burned timbers and had them milled into lumber for remodeling their house. What was left over they gave to lucky me. I cut all the parts for the chair from one 18' 4 x 6. It was nearly clear vertical grain with a couple of small knots. The moisture was about 5.5%.

The other chair on the bench is my pattern chair. I am always tweaking the geometry a little for comfort. This time I used one less splat so that the spine will fit between the splats not right on one. It's is more comfortable.

One more day and I should have all the parts done and put together. Then its spoke shaves, scrapers, rasps and sandpaper.

I think my friend will like it, even if he already has a rocker. It will look good on his porch.

Bret
 

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Nice looking chair, I like the design. Good idea with the spaced splat. CVG Fir is a good choice, because it's free, and will likely serve well. My first "experimental" furniture was a dining table from CVG Fir in the early 70's. I still have it and still like it. No problems (yet) with using that species.

You may find that taking the parts from a big chunk that dry may respond to changes in RH. You've likely acclimated the wood to your shop, so it may not be an issue. Sharing your work is appreciated.






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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The moisture continent was consistent throughout the 4 x 6 is what I meant to say. Which made me confident of its stability. The seat is the main area to be concerned about movement with this style of chair but the design allows for the movement.

Bret
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
nbo10 said:
Very nice. How do you shape the top of the seat?
I use a Lancelot chain saw wheel with a shop made jig. Then I use gouges, small hand planes, disc sander then finally a ROS.

Bret
 

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Very nice. If I did that, mine would be a very boring set of pics, as there almost never anything on my workbench. I don't get out there nearly as much as I would like to.
 

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Nice looking chairs. Thanks for posting. :thumbsup:

I like the idea of the thread, although currently on my workbench is a lot of clutter. ;)
 

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Sad, but only cause I don't have a workbench...
 

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Lola Ranch said:
Why no bench? No room? Haven't built one yet? You, my friend, need a bench. How can I help? Bret
Thanks for the offer. Part of my dilemma is space. I just don't have much working out of my 2-car garage. Part of it is cost. I really want a quality hardwood top but I'd have to purchase it. I have 2 nice older vises that I intend on using when I get a bench. Part of it is also skills as I'd really love to build a good bench with true M & T jointers, which I've never done.

I actually purchased some MDF the other day with the idea of building a temporary bench that I can use for now. I already have some plywood and misc scraps I can use with it. Main use will be as an assembly table more than anything else for now at least. And I'm going to put it on locking casters so. Can easily move it.

Due to my wife's Black Friday weekend work schedule, I'm actually hoping to work on it over the next few days. Hopefully I have enough propane for my space heater as its &$&@$) cold in my garage right now.

Mark
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for the offer. Part of my dilemma is space. I just don't have much working out of my 2-car garage. Part of it is cost. I really want a quality hardwood top but I'd have to purchase it. I have 2 nice older vises that I intend on using when I get a bench. Part of it is also skills as I'd really love to build a good bench with true M & T jointers, which I've never done.

I actually purchased some MDF the other day with the idea of building a temporary bench that I can use for now. I already have some plywood and misc scraps I can use with it. Main use will be as an assembly table more than anything else for now at least. And I'm going to put it on locking casters so. Can easily move it.

Due to my wife's Black Friday weekend work schedule, I'm actually hoping to work on it over the next few days. Hopefully I have enough propane for my space heater as its &$&@$) cold in my garage right now.

Mark
I have managed to get by as a woodworker for over four decades without out a fancy hardwood bench. Don't get me wrong, I would like to have one, but obviously it hasn't been a priority. You don't have to have a vise if you have a bench to clamp things to or screw cleats to the tip to hold your work in place. Sure beats working on the floor.

simple worktable.jpg

This sketch shows a simple easy to build work bench that can be built from one sheet of 3/4" plywood or MDF. The top is 2' x 4'. The shelf is 41" x 17". All the other parts are cut from 2-1/4" rips. Screw or nail it together. 34" is the total height. It's is light, and workbenches are best if very heavy so you would want to screw it to the wall or floor when in use. It could easily be stored out of the way when not in use.

Bret
 

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Lola Ranch said:
I have managed to get by as a woodworker for over four decades without out a fancy hardwood bench. Don't get me wrong, I would like to have one, but obviously it hasn't been a priority. You don't have to have a vise if you have a bench to clamp things to or screw cleats to the tip to hold your work in place. Sure beats working on the floor. This sketch shows a simple easy to build work bench that can be built from one sheet of 3/4" plywood or MDF. The top is 2' x 4'. The shelf is 41" x 17". All the other parts are cut from 2-1/4" rips. Screw or nail it together. 34" is the total height. It's is light, and workbenches are best if very heavy so you would want to screw it to the wall or floor when in use. It could easily be stored out of the way when not in use. Bret
I actually download a free set of plans from a site the other day that I am going to use. Size of top is 30x60. I'm going to modify the plans slightly to put one vice on the right side end and the other vice on the front far left corner. I'm also not planning on the front beg board style support as I've never used one and based on my my projects don't see the need, at least at this time. Otherwise it's just like this:

Mark
 

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where's my table saw?
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Get a slab door

Sad, but only cause I don't have a workbench...
A slab door, new or used, but sight it for straight and flat. It will most likely be fine. Set it on 2 file cabinets that are the same height, and screw up from the bottom OR frame around them to keep it from moving. Lay a piece of particle or hardboard/Masonite on top and a few screws or sticky tape and ..... BAM, you've got a decent, heavy and flat bench. Saw horses will work but not as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Mark, I think the wheels would make it wobbly.

Happy Thanksgiving everyone.

The chair is now off the bench but I'm not in the shop today. got a turkey to eat.

Bret

PB280197.jpg

PB280199.jpg
 

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I actually download a free set of plans from a site the other day that I am going to use. Size of top is 30x60. I'm going to modify the plans slightly to put one vice on the right side end and the other vice on the front far left corner. I'm also not planning on the front beg board style support as I've never used one and based on my my projects don't see the need, at least at this time. Otherwise it's just like this:

Mark
Looks like a pretty good design. If I may make a suggestion, look into modifying it for a leg vise. They are cheap, have greater holding power, and have a larger depth for working on wider pieces of wood. Having used both and now having a leg vise, I am very happy I went that way instead of a traditional face vise.

All you need is to double up on some 6/4 hardwood, a lee valley vice screw http://www.leevalley.com/US/Wood/page.aspx?p=41664&cat=1,41659, a piece of 4/4 wood drilled with holes, and something to use as a pin.
 

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I didn't want to let Wisconsin winter weather kill all my project ideas. My garage will hopefully be replaced in a year or two (hopefully before it falls down) with a super new space with plenty of workshop room, but the current building is not heated or insulated and shared with several mice. Last weekend I picked up a solid core slab door and some 2x6s and 2x4s and threw together a nice heavy workbench in my basement for under $100.

Right now I'm 400 miles from home visiting in-laws. I'm having a good time, but can't wait to get back home and make some sawdust. Starting to feel the crunch to get some Xmas gifts made!

Beautiful rocking chair Bret. I'm a newb, making candle holders, shelves and decorative stuff so far, but hope to have some great furniture projects in the works someday.
 

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Currently on the workbench while the first part of the finish is curing is my coffee table. Picture is on my table saw, but it's on my workbench at the moment.



And the top which is on top of my tool cart for my mechanic tools:

 
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