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Discussion Starter #1
many thanks for your help --

ready to take the plunge -- interested in your thoughts on the best value for a floor model 8" jointer -- max budget is $ 1400.
 

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where's my table saw?
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The grizzly is awesome, I had a chance to fool around with one at a shop once. I also love the older Delta X's that were made in the US. You can find those easily on Craigslist for under $600
 

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many thanks for the replies -- had been looking at that grizzly --

steve -- found a couple of used on craigs list -- how do you tell its still a good tool ? are there tests / measurements you should do ? take a test piece of wood ?
i found a 8" powermatic 90's vintage and a slightly newer delta DJ20 --

appreciate your thoughts and experience --

larry
 

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where's my table saw?
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a jointer is a simple machine

A motor, a rotating cutterhead, 2 bearings, fence and 2 tables. Not much to go wrong that won't be obvious except the table's alignment. To test for that you'll need a straight edge, however it's nothing that can't be adjust later IF everything else works.

The motor should start right out of the gate, the whole unit should not vibrate, the blades can be sharpened if dull or nicked, the fence can be squared up, the tables polished and waxed if rusted ...etc.

You might question the seller as to reasons for selling. Moving up in size? Getting out of woodwroking? Estate sale? etc. :blink:
 

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I just took a similar plunge; moved from 4" to 8" long bed. My primary shop is almost totally WWII era Delta(Milwaukee), and I really lucked out on an 8" jointer that matches. The previous owner had replaced the original belt with a link belt, put the jointer on a modern mobile base(which, despite it's lack of authenticity, is pretty f-in awesome), and new knives for the cutterhead. The only issue is a crack in the porkchop, which is off to a local smith for repair right now. All told, I paid 325 dollars, which is NOT what anyone should expect. I'm not gloating, but rather, trying I make a point: whether you prefer old or new tools, if you have the opportunity to exercise patience, there are amazing deals to be had. Unfortunately, the woodworking industry has taken a big hit, shutting down large furniture and cabinetry shops across the board. I am not saying that you should be a vulture and try to profit from the suffering of others, but there is something to be said for "right place, right time". Watch the auction houses, sites, classifieds, and scrapyards(yes, scrapyards; these bigger machines get scrapped ALL THE TIME, because they're so big, and people don't want to deal with them), and check out EVERYTHING that looks promising. You never know what you may find. Good luck to you, and don't be scared of older machines!

WCT
 

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many thanks for the replies -- had been looking at that grizzly --

steve -- found a couple of used on craigs list -- how do you tell its still a good tool ? are there tests / measurements you should do ? take a test piece of wood ?
i found a 8" powermatic 90's vintage and a slightly newer delta DJ20 --

appreciate your thoughts and experience --

larry
I would stay away from Delta. They have been having trouble with their parts department for more than a year and is looking like they never will sell parts again. As far a checking the saw if you could get the seller to plug the machine in and turn it on it should be alright. For the most part if a machine looks like it has been taken care of it probably was. They almost never break down. Powermatic is a great brand but you might watch to see if is 3 phase as a lot of big companies use powermatic. That isn't a problem but makes more expense getting it usable. You would have to have some kind of phase converter to run it off of your household current.
 

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from steve -- but you might watch to see if is 3 phase as a lot of big companies use powermatic. That isn't a problem but makes more expense getting it usable. You would have to have some kind of phase converter to run it off of your household current.

the powermatic was originally a commercial unit with a 3 phase motor -- the seller said he would change it to a single phase for residential use -- will the capabilities of the jointer suffer in the process ??
 

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from steve -- but you might watch to see if is 3 phase as a lot of big companies use powermatic. That isn't a problem but makes more expense getting it usable. You would have to have some kind of phase converter to run it off of your household current.

the powermatic was originally a commercial unit with a 3 phase motor -- the seller said he would change it to a single phase for residential use -- will the capabilities of the jointer suffer in the process ??
If the HP of the motor is the same, it wouldn't matter if it was three phase or not. In a factory that has three phase power it is just cheaper on the electric bill to run a machine on three phase. Find out what HP motor the three phase motor is and see that the HP on the single phase motor is the same. You would be able to get 220V single phase at your house.
 
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